Welcome Guest!
 Indigenous News
 Previous Message All Messages Next Message 
Native Share (lots)  andre cramblit
 Feb 06, 2008 11:42 PST 

View All Topics | Create New Topic Messages
1.
hi there
Posted by: "prairiefire50" wakiyanih-@yahoo.com   prairiefire50
Tue Feb 5, 2008 11:13 am (PST)

Im new..lol... ummm. was wondering since all these posts are for other
states,then are there any events of interest to the Indian community
in columbus ohio? we seem to have a NaTiVe thing where the real ones
do not even associate with each other.. Im only finding out about
indian students at OSU here and their happy band of powwow things and
indian things nothing of which I dont think I ever heard of related to
the indian centre here... hmmmm. so ya got any native things we could
do here for the TRANSPLANT community here? there are no real indians
here in ohio or pa..only us transplants.. trying to teach the cultures
but also trying to learn... its hard here because of the invaded
fakeries and posers here..

Back to top Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
2.
NIEA to hold a field hearing on NCLB in Anchorage, AK and New Specia
Posted by: "Michael" mwoest-@niea.org   mikewest17
Tue Feb 5, 2008 11:13 am (PST)

[Field Hearing] <http://www.niea.org/media/news.php>

On January 29th, President Willard Gilbert will conduct a listening
session/field hearing on the impact of the No Child Left Behind Act in
Indian Country in Anchorage, Alaska. This session will be held in
conjunction with the 34th Annual Bilingual and Multicultural Education
Equity conference and the hearing will be held from 1:30- 4:00pm at the
Sheraton Anchorage Hotel located at 402 East 6th Avenue, Anchorage,
Alaska.

Everyone is invited to attend and participate in this very important
session/hearing that will focus on the strengths and areas for improving
the existing No Child Left Behind Act. Your input in the form of
comments, stories, and recommendations is being requested as we collect
information and continue to draft tribal recommendations regarding the
education of Native students. Copies of NIEA's amendments to NCLB
will be available and discussed during this session. Submittal of
written testimonies with recommendations citing proposed changes in the
law is strongly encouraged. WE NEED TO HEAR FROM YOU TO MAKE SURE NO
INDIAN CHILD IS LEFT BEHIND!

[CLICK HERE!] <https://www.niea.org/events/summit_order.php>

This is a great time to get our students and youth involved in the
policy making process on behalf of the National Indian Education
Association. We encourage our Students to join us in Washington, DC!

The Student Rate for the 11th Annual Legislative Summit 2008
registration in only $50!

Deadline for Pre-Registration is February 1, 2008 (8 days away). Please
register ASAP so that NIEA may coordinate meetings with your
Congressional delegation! There is no age restriction to being a
student, but you must mail or fax in this registration form with your
transcript.

If you cannot see the images above, please visit our website.
<http://www.niea.org/events/summit.php>
<---------------------------------------
If you would like to be removed from our list-serve, please send your
request to ni-@niea.org <mailto:ni-@niea.org> .
Back to top Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
3.
adding our link...
Posted by: "Michael Woestehoff (NIEA)" mwoest-@niea.org   mikewest17
Tue Feb 5, 2008 11:13 am (PST)

I'd like to add our link to this Group. Please let me know what I can
do.

Michael Woestehoff (Navajo Nation)

Membership and Communications Coordinator

NATIONAL INDIAN EDUCATION ASSOCIATION

110 Maryland Ave. NE Suite 104

Washington, DC 20002

mwoest-@niea.org

(202) 544-7290

Back to top Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
4.
Fwd: ***DQU is Hosting The Longest Walk 2***
Posted by: "Alyssa Macy" alyss-@gmail.com
Tue Feb 5, 2008 11:13 am (PST)

*

Feb4th-Feb8th DQU Grounds Preparation
Volunteer leaders training
Gather fire woods
Pick up donations

Febuary9th (Saturday) walkers will be arriving. Bloody Island Run to DQU

Entrance of DQU registration (vehicle assignment, dorm assignment,
campsite
assignment, media-camera registration)

passing out arm bands 4 colors. Walker, spectator, volunteer, leaders.
7am Leave to Clear Lake to join Bloody Island Run
8am safety meeting, briefing of committees
10am Brunch
Noon Orientation about the longest walk and what expected of the event
participators
5pm Expecting Bloody Island Runners to Arrive at DQU
Upon arrival rally with speakers
6pm Dinner
7pm Movie Presentation with speakers Floyds, "Exterminate Them!"

Security, peace keepers, medicine patrol
Event coordinators/ Bloody Island Run
Walker accommodators
North team, central team,
Drivers/ Vehicles to and from Robinson
Cooks/servers
24hour team
Speakers on arrival of runners
Campsite location
Foot crew
Video/ sound tech for movie
Elder dormitories/elder team
entrance team
seating and crowd control

Febuary10th (Sunday) walkers will be arriving. Traditional Social
Gathering/
Evening concert

Entrance of DQU registration (vehicle assignment, dorm assignment,
campsite
assignment, media-camera registration)

passing out arm bands 4 colors. Walker, spectator, volunteer, leaders.
8am safety meeting, briefing of committees
10am Brunch- Vendors arrive
Noon Orientation for walkers and visitors
1pm Start of Gathering
1pm Razzle Dazzle opening prayer
1:15pm Speaker 1
1:30pm Speaker 2
1:45pm Speaker 3
2pm- 2:45pm Dancers and Singers Start
2:45pm -3pm MC a nd Speaker 4
3pm- 3:45pm Singers and Dancers
3:45pm- 4pm MC and Speaker 5
4pm- 4:45pm Singers and Dancers
4:45pm- 5pm MC and Closing Prayer
5pm Dinner
6:30pm Start of Concert Performances
6:30- 6:45pm MC
6:45- 7:05pm Performer 1
7:05pm- 7:15pm MC
7:15pm- 7:35pm Performer 2
7:35pm- 7:45pm MC
7:45pm- 7:05pm Performer 3
7:05pm- 7:15pm MC
7:15pm- 7:35pm Performer 4
7:35pm- 7:45pm MC
7:45pm- 8:05pm Performer 5
8:05pm- 8:15pm MC
8:15- 9:00pm GOODSHIELD
9:00pm- 9:20pm MC
9:20pm- 10:05pm PARA LA GENTE
10:05pm- 10:25 MC
10:25pm-11:25pm SAVAGE FAMILY
11:25pm-11:35pm MC Closing of Show
Evening sweat at ceremonial grounds facilitated by Darrell Standing Elk
and
Gregory Irons

Security, peace keepers, medicine patrol
Event coordinators/gathering-concert
Walker accommodators
North team, central team, (perimeter)
MC-Harold Belmont, MC- Mashekae
Cooks/servers
24 hour team
Concert organizers, sound tech
Campsite location
Foot crew
Seating and crowd control
Elder dormitories/ elder team
Entrance team
Guest speakers and MC

Febuary11th (Monday) Alcatraz sunrise gathering , Evening Community
Potluck
with Movie Presentations

Entrance of DQU registration (vehicle assignment, dorm assignment,
campsite
assignment, media-camera registration)

passing out arm bands 4 colors. Walker, spectator, volunteer, leaders

3am Caravan Leave towards Alcatraz Gathering
8am safety meeting, briefing of committees
10am Brunch
Noon Orientation
6pm-7pm Arrival of Alcatraz caravan
Upon arrival announcement and Speakers
6:30pm- 7:30pm Potluck Dinner start
9pm movie night Reel Indians
9pm Longest Wlak Documentary-Dennis Banks (29mins)
9:30pm History of AIM- Vernon Belcourt/ Dick Bancroft
Alcatraz Is not an Island
DQU documentaries- 2005, 2005, 2006, 2007
Shellmound
Save The Peaks
Bloody Island

Security, peace keepers, medicine patrol
Event coordinators/movie night
Walker accommodators
North team, central team, (perimeter)
Sound tech and projector tech
Cooks/servers
24 hour team
Movie collector committee
Campsite location
Foot crew
Seating and crowd control
Elder dormitories/ elder team
Entrance team
Guest speakers and presentations

Febuary12th (Tuesday) morning take-off to respected start off locations

Entrance of DQU registration (vehicle assignment, dorm assignment,
campsite
assignment, media-camera registration)

passing out arm bands 4 colors. Walker, spectator, volunteer, leaders

Morning before Noon
6am Breakfast
7am Southern Route walkers leave to Rumsey Rancheria (Cache Creek) for
Breakfast
~runners run towards capitol
~return from Rumsey Rancheria start walk
7:30am Northern Route leaves to State Capitol
9am Set-up at West Side of State Capitol\
~ DQU Drum singers
10am Press Conference
~11-12 Speakers
Noon Walkers Leave State Capitol walking along Folsom Blvd. Until Folsom
1pm Break Down at Capitol

Security, peace keepers, medicine patrol
Clean- up Crew
Walker accommodators
North team, central team, (perimeter)
Trash haul off
Cooks/servers
24 hour team
Trash pick up
Campsite location
Foot crew
Recycler separation
Elder dormitories/ elder team
Entrance team

Donations Issues
Food
Propane
Fire woods, Sweat Rocks, Canvas for Sweat
Cloth Arm Band preparations
4 colors with silkscreen commemorative images (black, red, white,
yellow)
Craft vendors for Sunday events 10 max. arrive at 10am- midnight
Medicines (Cedar, Sage, Tobacco, Sweat Grass, etc.)
Waste Management- trash haul off
Cleaning Supplies- rags, buckets, bleach, mopheads

24 hour room
Special Situations
Movement Alley
Talking circle
Showers, restrooms(porta-johns)
Info booths on struggles and activism
cafe
Sudden errand crew with vehicle
Workshops and exhibitions
Music jam
Lost and found
Tree climb exhib. With Zachary Runningwolf
First aid supplies

End Note:
Second volunteer meeting January 30th at DQU campus 10pm-midnight.
Contact us to fill all planned events and positions to make this happen
smoothly
The Longest Walk mission is "All Life is Sacred, Save Mother Earth"

Longest Walk Website: www.Longestwalk.org and
www.myspace.com/thelongestwalk30yearanniv
D-Q University Website: www.myspace.com/dquniversity

Date of Release: Thursday, January 24, 2008

Arial Map of D-Q University

Registration Expectations
Name, Mailing Address, Number of passengers, Identify- Walker?
Spectator?
Volunteer? Media?
Campsite? Or Dorm for elder?
Media- name, address, affiliation, register camera or camcorder,
credentials
Adhere to no pictures during prayer and ceremony
ask individuals for permission for close-up pictures
Vehicle Identification- colored sticker marking for daily visitors and
colored marking for campers
Rules
NO ALCOHOL! NO DRUGS! NO VIOLENCE!

Date of Release: Thursday, January 24, 2008

United Native Americans Inc. *

*Fighting for Natives Since 1968.*

*Join us*

*at*

http://www.myspace.com/unitednativeamericansinc

------------------------------
Connect and share in new ways with Windows Live. Get it
now!<http://www.windowslive.com/share.html?ocid=TXT_TAGHM_Wave2_sharelife_012008>


--
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Alyssa Macy
Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Oregon

Indigenius Media
http://www.indigeniusmedia.com

International Indian Treaty Council
http://www.treatycouncil.org

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Back to top Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
5.
An invitation to sign the iwi indigenous paati site
Posted by: "karenapuhi" karen-@yahoo.co.uk
Tue Feb 5, 2008 11:13 am (PST)

Kia ora

This is a special invitation for you to join the mailing list for the
Iwi independence Paati the newest political paati in aotearoa.

by joining this site you agree to be a member of the iwi independence
paati

Our initial goal is to have five hundred people sign up as financial
members of the iwi independence paati, the cost is a gold coin or a koha


From time to time, we add new information, video, audio or pictures to
the site. By joining this list, we'll be able to quickly send you an
email when we think there's something new you'd want to know about.

Just click this link and you'll be added:
http://members.freewebs.com/Members/Subscriptions/confirm.jsp?inviteID=2732991&hash=a1104433b7716a4b0d91c10c473d3b08&action=accept


You can see the site here:
http://members.freewebs.com/Members/Subscriptions/confirm.jsp?inviteID=2732991&hash=a1104433b7716a4b0d91c10c473d3b08&action=respond&next=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.freewebs.com%2Fkarenapuhi%2F


If you've got a spam filter on your email account, please make sure to
set it to allow my mails to come through!

Thanks and I'll talk to you soon,

karenapuhi

ps: go to our bebo site at bebo.com/iwiindependence paati

PS: If you don't want to subscribe, click here:
http://members.freewebs.com/Members/Subscriptions/confirm.jsp?inviteID=2732991&hash=a1104433b7716a4b0d91c10c473d3b08&action=decline

Back to top Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
6.
National Indian Education Association Remembers Carole Anne Heart, F
Posted by: "NI-@niea.org" NI-@niea.org
Tue Feb 5, 2008 11:13 am (PST)

NIEA - National Indian Education Association
<http://www.niea.org> January 28, 2008
Broadcast #08-006

National Indian Education Association Remembers Carole Anne
Heart,
Former NIEA President as Tenacious and Vigilant for Education
Equality

[Carole Anne Heart at 2001 NIEA Billings Convention]
The National Indian Education Association would like to send its
deepest condolences to all of us affected by the loss of Carole
Anne Heart, our 2001 NIEA President and a true friend of this
organization.

“It is with deep regret that I inform you that past NIEA
President and friend Carole Anne Heart, passed away in Rapid City
South Dakota Friday January 25, 2008 after a heroic battle with
cancer. Our prayers and thoughts go out to Carole's family and
all she deeply touched with her heart and humor. She will be
greatly missed,” said current NIEA President, Willard
Sakiestewa Gilbert.

During her term as NIEA President, she spoke as a mentor, a
mother, teacher and sister to the organization’s membership
and remained active in Native education issues throughout her
entire life. At the 2001 NIEA Annual Convention, Carole Anne
spoke out about the use of names and logos that were derogatory
to Native people. She supported alternative education systems,
and advocated for strategies to increase the graduation rates of
American Indian students which NIEA continues today with the
partnership in the Campaign for High School Equity.

Carole Anne Heart, Sicangu Lak! ota, had a great spirit that
illuminated her work and her life. NIEA is fortunate to have
known her, and especially fortunate to have worked along with her
at the Aberdeen Area Tribal Chairman’s Health Board to which
she gave so much of her energy to achieve health awareness. She
inspired and pushed people to higher levels of achievement. She
will be missed for what she did and gave us all, but also for who
she was.

Carole Anne Heart’s tenacious goal to achieve education
equality has persevered and her contributions will never be
forgotten within the National Indian Education Association.


For more information regarding Carole Ann Heart, please refer to
NIEA’s website, www.niea.org
<http://www.niea.org/media/news_detail.php?id=58&catid=>
Or email your remarks to membe-@niea.org
<mailto:membe-@niea.org> .

---------------------------------------
If you would like to be removed from our list-serve, please send
your request to ni-@niea.org <mailto:ni-@niea.org> .

<http://www.niea.org>



Back to top Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
7.
VSA Arts' Call for Entries: Derivative Composition
Posted by: "Alyssa Macy" native-@yahoo.com   nativeshare
Tue Feb 5, 2008 11:13 am (PST)

VSA Arts' Call for Entries: Derivative Composition

WASHINGTON.- VSA arts is seeking visual artists with disabilities
ages 18 and up whose work is inspired by the performing arts
for "Derivative Composition, " an international juried art exhibition
that will be on display at the John F. Kennedy Center for the
Performing Arts in Washington, D.C., from May 29-July 20, 2008. Two-
and three-dimensional art, digital art, installations, video and
film, and other media that draw inspiration from music, theater, or
dance are eligible. Submissions must have been completed in the last
five years and after the onset of disability. Applications will be
accepted through March 21, 2008. For more information, please visit
www.vsarts.org/ derivativecompos ition or call (202) 628-2800.

VSA arts is an international nonprofit organization founded in 1974
by Ambassador Jean Kennedy Smith to create a society where people
with disabilities learn through, participate in, and enjoy the arts.
VSA arts provides educators, parents, and artists with resources and
the tools to support arts programming in schools and communities. VSA
arts showcases the accomplishments of artists with disabilities and
promotes increased access to the arts for people with disabilities.
Each year millions of people participate in VSA arts programs through
a nationwide network of affiliates and in 55 countries around the
world. VSA arts is an affiliate of the John F. Kennedy Center for the
Performing Arts. For more information about VSA arts, visit
www.vsarts.org.
Back to top Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
8.
Upcoming Literary Readings, Classes & Mentorships! | Intermedia Arts
Posted by: "Alyssa Macy" alyss-@gmail.com
Tue Feb 5, 2008 11:13 am (PST)

Hello,
We have some exciting opportunities for you; read on to find out what's
coming up this month and next!

Also, I hope to see you on February 2nd at our first annual Valentine's
fundraiser, Love Rox. It's going to be great—incredible food, wine,
silent auction, "pampering" stations, live performances, local poets
... the works! Details online at www.intermediaarts.org ...

See you there!
—Julie

** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** **
Spring Writer-to-Writer Applications Now Available!
Register for Winter Classes & Workshops!
February Literary Readings—The Carol Connolly Reading Series

** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** **

SPRING 2008 WRITER-TO-WRITER APPLICATIONS NOW AVAILABLE!
Deadline to Apply: February 8, 2008

Calling all writers! Applications are now available for our spring
session of Writer-to-Writer, the artistic mentorship program designed
to give advanced writers the opportunity to reach their next level of
artistic development. Writer-to-Writer creates intimate relationships
between artists; mentors act as artistic catalysts and partners,
providing each mentee with artistic feedback and professional guidance.
Read more about our Spring mentorships with Anya Achtenberg
(fiction/memoir) and Sherry Quan Lee (poetry) online here:
http://www.intermediaarts.org/pages/programs/literary/wtw.php.
Applications available online!

This program is supported by the Jerome Foundation in celebration of
the Jerome Hill Centennial and in recognition of the valuable cultural
contributions of artists to society.

WINTER CLASSES & WORKSHOPS—Register Today!
Class Title: Body + Identity: An Exploration
Dates: Mondays, February 18 – March 10
Sessions: 4
Times: 6:30-8:30PM
Course Type: Class
Location: Intermedia Arts; Classroom
Instructors: Jila Nikpay
This class uses photography, slide lecture, and a cross-cultural
approach to engage the participants in the creative exploration of
their body identity. Through various exercises, and interactive
photography the students will have an opportunity to draw from the vast
reservoir of their own personal history and imagination, expressing
their inner body image. The resulting photographs, created by the
instructor, will be used for a facilitated group discussion. In this
dynamic group dialogue, women use their intellect and collective
cultural memory to examine the authentic self-expression of the body.
Students will keep a 3 x 5 image of themselves as a record their
self-discovery. This course has an additional $25 materials fee. No
refunds after February 11, 2008.

Class Title: Exploring Creativity Through Writing and Bodywork
Dates: Mondays, March 3 & 10
Sessions: 2
Times: 6-9PM
Course Type: Intensive
Location: Intermedia Arts; Theater
Instructors: Jules Nyquist and Amy Mattila
Explore writing, creativity and bodywork exercises to unblock your
creative process, set goals, and promote healing. This class will
include a blend of writing exercises, individual mediation, and ritual.
We will use aromatherapy and individual/small group bodywork (hands,
head, shoulders, pressure points, chakras) to tap into the creative
process with the body as well as the mind. No refunds after February
25, 2008.

*All of our courses are offered according to an income-based sliding
fee scale. Find complete course descriptions, instructor bios, course
fees and registration information online here:
http://www.intermediaarts.org/pages/classes/

THE CAROL CONNOLLY READING SERIES
February 2008

The Carol Connolly Readings
Friday, February 8, 2008
7:30 PM at Banfill-Locke Center for the Arts
6666 E River Rd, Fridley
Hosted by Anna George Meek
Free and open to the public
Featuring:
MARY JO THOMPSON is an MFA candidate in Poetry at Warren Wilson Program
for Writers in Asheville, North Carolina, and a Minneapolis Public
School teacher on special assignment in arts education. Her poetry has
appeared in national and regional journals and can be viewed in public
installations at the Minnesota Center for Book Arts and the Minnesota
Children's Museum.

RAY GONZALEZ is the author of nine books of poetry including
Consideration of the Guitar (2005). His other titles from BOA include
The Hawk Temple at Tierra Grande (2002), a winner of a 2003 Minnesota
Book Award in Poetry, Cabato Sentora (1999); and The Heat of Arrivals
(1996), a winner of a 1997 PEN/Josephine Miles Book Award. He has
served as Poetry Editor of The Bloomsbury Review for twenty-five years
and founded LUNA, a poetry journal, in 1998. He received a Lifetime
Acheivement Award in Literature from the Border Regional Library
Association in 2003 and is a Full Professor in the MFA Creative Writing
Program at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis.

This Carol Connolly Reading is sponsored in part by Banfill-Locke
Center for the Arts.

Color Theory for the 21st Century: Beyond the Pure
Readings by Writers of Color
Thursday, February 14, 2008
7:00 PM at Patrick's Cabaret
3010 Minnehaha Ave, Minneapolis
Hosted by Sun Yung Shin
Free and open to the public
Featuring:
KATIE LEO is an adopted Korean writer, actor, and educator. Her work
has appeared in 60 Seconds to Shine: Monologues for Men, Talking Stick
Vol. 13, Journal of the Asian American Renaissance, and HardKore, a lit
mag out of Koreatown, Chicago. Her chapbook, Attempts at Location,
will be published through Finishing Line Press in January 2008. She
also has work forthcoming in the anthology, Belonging: Words and Images
of Home. She is an MFA candidate in writing at the University of
Minnesota.

ARLENE JOYOUNG KIM, a 2nd-generation Korean-American, grew up in the DC
area, graduated from Brown University in 1995, and worked in Seattle as
an editor for MSNBC before moving to Minneapolis. She is currently in
the University of Minnesota's graduate writing program for poetry.

This Carol Connolly Reading is co-sponsored by Patrick's Cabaret.

Readings by Writers
Tuesday, February 19, 2008
7:30 PM at the historic University Club of St. Paul
420 Summit Ave, St. Paul
Hosted by Carol Connolly
Free and open to the public
Featuring:
SUSAN DEBORAH KING, poet, whose third book of poems ONE BREASTED WOMAN
is from Holy! Cow Press, and follows her COVEN and TABERNACLE: Poems of
an Island. She teaches writing at the U of M, SASE, The Loft, and is a
former Presbyterian minister, psychotherapist, and founder of the
enormously well received Literary Witnesses Reading Series at Plymouth
Congregational Church. Do you know? Every 1.9 minutes a woman is
diagnosed with breast cancer, and every 13 minutes someone dies from
it. "Into this new age," Judith Guest says, "when more of us are
learning to live with the epidemic of cancer in our world, comes a
moving and musical collection of poetry that will, I am sure, save
lives."

LESLIE ADRIENNE MILLER, poet, author of THE RESURRECTION TRADE,
Graywolf Press, her fifth book of poems, which is inspired by the
mysteries of early anatomical studies and medical illustrations as well
as the business end of trafficking in corpses, which, in turn, made
possible the art of anatomy. Her meticulous research, here and abroad,
prefaced her crafting of the fine poems in this well-received
collection that yields truths about the objectification and
misunderstanding of women's bodies throughout history. U.S. Poet
Laureate Ted Kooser calls these poems "delightfully eclectic, learned
and wise." This new book follows Miller's EAT QUITE EVERYTHING YOU
SEE, also from Graywolf; and YESTERDAY HAD A MAN IN IT; UNGODLINESS;
and STAYING UP FOR LOVE; all from Carnegie Mellon Press. Widely
published in literary magazines and journals, Miller is a professor of
English at the University of St Thomas.

Readers will have their books available to sell and sign.
Readings last one hour, never more.
MEMBERS and NON-MEMBERS welcome for these events.
5:00 Dinner—OPTIONAL—reservations necessary
Some University Club reading sites are handicapped accessible; please
inquire in advance: www.universityclubofstpaul.com or 651-222-1751.

This Carol Connolly Reading is sponsored in part by the University Club
of St. Paul.

Speculations
Monday, February 25, 2008
6:30 PM at DreamHaven Books
912 W Lake St, Minneapolis
Hosted by Eric Heideman
Free and open to the public
Featuring:
TERRY FAUST is the author of the humorous science fiction novel Z is
for Xenophobe, with short fiction forthcoming in Tales of the
Unanticipated #29. He is a professional photographer, has co-scripted
and produced a short film with the assistance of a State Arts Board
Grant, won the Loft's Literary Prize for Young Adult Fiction in 1991,
and has written radio plays for KFAI.

Speculations is a co-production with SF Minnesota, a multicultural
speculative fiction organization.
Readings run until 7:30 and are followed by a reception with free soda
pop and cookies.
This Carol Connolly Reading is sponsored in part by DreamHaven Books.

GLBT Reading Series
Wednesday, February 27, 2008
7:00 PM at Intermedia Arts
2822 Lyndale Ave S, Minneapolis
with guest host Julie Bates
Free and open to the public
Featuring:
ANDREA JENKINS is a poet and writer living in Minneapolis. She has had
poems and essays published in various journals and publications, and is
a former columnist for LivingOUT and The Minneapolis Observer. She is
a former member of the Black Storytellers Alliance, and has taught a
four-week poetry workshop for 7th & 8th graders, as well as a poetry
workshop for 4th, 5th and 6th graders at the Rainbow Families
Conference. Andrea has won numerous awards including a Loft Mentorship
Series (2002-03), and she attended the Napa Valley Writers Conference
in 2004. She also participated in four Cave Canem poetry workshops at
the Loft from 2001-2005. She is currently pursuing an MFA in Writing
from Hamline University.

JOHN MEDEIROS is a writer living in Minneapolis. His work has appeared
in Water~Stone Review, The Talking Stick, Gulf Coast; Willow Springs;
Gents, Badboys and Barbarians: An Anthology of New Gay Male Poetry;
Evergreen Chronicles; Christopher Street; Chiron Review; and Writers
Against War. He is the recipient of a Minnesota State Arts Board
grant; Gulf Coast's First Place Nonfiction Award; and the Blacklock
Nature Sanctuary Fellowship for Emerging Artists. He is a graduate of
Hamline University, where his memoir Self, Divided was awarded the 2006
Outstanding Creative Nonfiction Thesis of the Year, and his work has
been nominated for a Pushcart Prize. He served as the
Writer-in-Residence at the Banfill-Locke Center for the Arts in
Fridley, Minnesota for 2006 and 2007.

For more information on these or any other literary readings or events,
call (612) 871-4444 or visit www.intermediaarts.org.

Create. Engage. Inspire. Change.
www.intermediaarts.org

*If you would prefer not to receive announcements about our literary
programming,
please reply to this email with "UNSUBSCRIBE" in the subject line.

ABOUT INTERMEDIA ARTS
Intermedia Arts is Minnesota's premier multicultural, multidisciplinary
arts center. We are a gathering place to share stories through visual
arts, theater, dance, music, media, and literature—from folk arts to
hip-hop culture. Intermedia Arts began in 1973 as a group of student
media activists, University Community Video. Over the last three
decades we've grown, become multidisciplinary, changed our name and
become internationally recognized for our innovative cultural
programs. One thing remains: our unwavering mission to use art as a
tool to build understanding among people. Intermedia Arts belongs to
the community it serves. We believe whole-heartedly in creative
leadership development. Artists are leaders. Leaders inspire. Our
programs grow organically from the issues facing our neighbors, friends
and community members. Together, we develop creative tools for
addressing challenges, sharing resources, celebrating positive change
and building healthy communities.

Julie Bates, SASE Literary Programs Manager
Intermedia Arts
2822 Lyndale Ave S, Mpls MN 55408
Tel: 612.874.2815
Fax: 612.871.6927
Back to top Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
9.
National Preservation Conference, Tulsa, OK info
Posted by: "Alyssa Macy" native-@yahoo.com   nativeshare
Tue Feb 5, 2008 11:13 am (PST)

My apologies on this one...I just came across it in my email. Still
backed up to NOVEMBER.

Please post directly to the list: native-@yahoogroups.com

Charlotte Bonini <Charlott-@nthp.org> wrote: From: Charlotte
Bonini <Charlott-@nthp.org>
To: "native-@yahoo.com" <native-@yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 20 Nov 2007 14:18:36 -0500
Subject: Posting for listserv

Hello,

A colleague of mine has just made me aware of your listserv. I am
responsible for the educational content for the national Preservation
Conference, which is being held in Tulsa, OK next year. I would really
like to find a way to include as many of the 66 recognized tribes of
Oklahoma as possible. Would it be possible to include the information
below as a posting to your listserv?

We invite you to submit proposals for Education Sessions, Poster
Presentations, or Field Sessions for the National Preservation
Conference. Here we go, yes, Tulsa is just around the bend and the
planning has already begun. The 2008 conference theme is "Preservation
in Progress".
The proposal site is up and running and we are anticipating your
fabulous proposals for the 2008 National Preservation Conference!

The deadline for Education Session, Poster Presentation, and Field
Session proposals is Friday January 11th.

Next year we are particularly interested in proposals dealing with the
following focus areas:
Green Building. Existing buildings contain embodied energy and other
environmental advantages that are important in sustainable communities.
What are models for combining green building and preservation? What
potential synergies and issues should be addressed? How can both USGBC's
LEED point system and preservation standards help realize these
potentials?
Recent Past and Modernism. Why are these resources important? What are
the trends, challenges, and opportunities for attracting support for
their preservation? What are successful community strategies and models
to do this?
Teardowns and McMansions in Older and Historic Neighborhoods. What are
the pros and cons of teardowns? How does a neighborhood determine the
vision for its future and craft and implement strategies to achieve that
vision? What are the most effective models for neighborhood action when
faced with teardowns?
Urban Revitalization and Adaptive Use. What are the advantages and
challenges of a preservation approach to urban revitalization? What
strategies and models work best for mid-sized cities? For major urban
areas?
Rural Revitalization. How can preservation strategies gain broader
support in rural economic development and farmland preservation
programs? What innovative models involve using cultural heritage tourism
to the economic benefit of rural areas?
Historic House Museums. What current trends affect visitation at
historic sites? What creative strategies can attract more visitors or
identify alternative uses for historic sites?
Historic Roads and Scenic Byways. What are we learning about ways to
promote protection and continued use of historic roads like Route 66?
What lessons can we learn from the growing support for scenic byways?

Instructions

Submitting your proposal is easy and quick.

For Education Session and Poster Presentations:
Go to http://www.eshow2000.com/nthp/call_for_abstracts.cfm

For Field Sessions (within a 90 miles radius of Tulsa):
Go to http://www.eshow2000.com/nthp/call_for_field_sessions.cfm

Many thanks,
Charlotte

Charlotte D. Bonini, PhD | Senior Education Planner, Center for
Preservation Leadership
National Trust for Historic Preservation | 1785 Massachusetts Avenue,
NW, Washington DC 20036
Phone: 202.588.6095 | Fax: 202.588.6223 | Email:
charlott-@nthp.org
“PRESERVATION IN PROGRESS” µ National Preservation Conference
Tulsa, Oklahoma µ October 21- 25, 2008


Back to top Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
10.
UCLA Pimu Catalina Island Archaeology Field School
Posted by: "drma-@fas.harvard.edu" drma-@fas.harvard.edu   
dizzydesi
Tue Feb 5, 2008 11:13 am (PST)



We invite you to participate in the Pimu Catalina Island Archaeology
Field
School, a new and innovative course that uses cutting edge scientific
tools in
a collaborative research project with Tongva/Gabrielino tribal members,
the
Santa Catalina Island Conservancy and the Cotsen Institute of
Archaeology at
UCLA.

Beginning June 22, 2008 and ending July 25, 2008, the field school is
especially
concerned with giving Native American community members and tribal
cultural
resource personnel a foundation in archaeological methods, theories and
laws
while immersing them in the 9,000 years of cultural history of the
Tongva/Gabrielino nation. It is hoped each participant will take this
knowledge
back to their community in order to efficiently and effectively respond
to and
engage in archaeological research.

Partial scholarships are available. See
p://www.archaeology.ucla.edu/pdf/CatalinaFieldSchoolScholarshipFlyer.pdf
for
more information and application materials.

Please see the website for more information:
http://www.archaeology.ucla.edu/Catalina/overview.htm.

Back to top Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
11.
NIEA to hold a field hearing on NCLB in Anchorage, AK and New Specia
Posted by: "NI-@niea.org" NI-@niea.org
Tue Feb 5, 2008 11:13 am (PST)

NIEA - National Indian Education Association
<http://www.niea.org> [Field Hearing]
<http://www.niea.org/media/news.php>

On January 29th, President Willard Gilbert will conduct a
listening session/field hearing on the impact of the No Child
Left Behind Act in Indian Country in Anchorage, Alaska. This
session will be held in conjunction with the 34th Annual
Bilingual and Multicultural Education Equity conference and the
hearing will be held from 1:30- 4:00pm at the Sheraton Anchorage
Hotel located at 402 East 6th Avenue, Anchorage, Alaska.

Everyone is invited to attend and participate in this very
important session/hearing that will focus on the strengths and
areas for improving the existing No Child Left Behind Act. Your
input in the form of comments, stories, and recommendations is
being requested as we collect information and continue to draft
tribal recommendations regarding the education of Native
students. Copies of NIEA’s amendments to NCLB will be
available and discussed during this session. Submittal of
written testimonies with recommendations citing proposed changes
in the law is strongly encouraged. WE NEED TO HEAR FROM YOU TO
MAKE SURE NO INDIAN CHILD IS LEFT BEHIND!

[CLICK HERE!] <https://www.niea.org/events/summit_order.php>

This is a great time to get our students and youth involved in
the policy making process on behalf of the National Indian
Education Association. We encourage our Students to join us in
Washington, DC!

The Student Rate for the 11th Annual Legislative Summit 2008
registration in only $50!

Deadline for Pre-Registration is February 1, 2008 (8 days away).
Please register ASAP so that NIEA may coordinate meetings with
your Congressional delegation! There is no age restriction to
being a student, but you must mail or fax in this registration
form with your transcript.


If you cannot see the images above, please visit our website.
<http://www.niea.org/events/summit.php>
---------------------------------------
If you would like to be removed from our list-serve, please send
your request to ni-@niea.org <mailto:ni-@niea.org> .

<http://www.niea.org>



Back to top Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
12a.
Indigenous Poverty: The True Story!
Posted by: "newtfn" new-@yahoo.ca   newtfn
Tue Feb 5, 2008 11:14 am (PST)


www.newtfn.com/thewholetruth.html
<http://www.newtfn.com/thewholetruth.html>

Back to top Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (2)
13.
1 29 08 US CDC Collegiate Leaders in EnvironmentalHealth summer unde
Posted by: "Alyssa Macy" alyss-@gmail.com
Tue Feb 5, 2008 11:14 am (PST)

Collegiate Leaders In Environmental Health: Summer Undergraduate
Internship
2008

CDC invites qualified applicants to apply for a ten week summer program
for
in Environmental Public Health at the National Center for Environmental
Health /Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH/ATSDR) in
Atlanta, Georgia. This is a 10 week paid summer internship for
undergraduate
students passionate about the environment, about health, and about the
link
between the two—this opportunity is for students majoring in
Environmental
Sciences, Environmental Studies, or related fields. This is a full time
summer opportunity for rising collegiate juniors and seniors to get
real-world experience in Environmental Public Health activities at the
federal level. Students will assist with projects and be paired with
mentors
to gain experience in the fascinating field of Environmental Public
Health.
Students that are majoring in Environmental Sciences/Studies or related
fields are encouraged to visit our website at ***
http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/cleh* <http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/cleh> .

Deadline for application: March 4, 2008
Program dates: June 4 -August 8, 2008

For questions concerning this announcement, please contact Cory Moore at
CMoo-@cdc.gov

This announcement has an assigned expiration date. If it remains
unopened,
it will disappear from your mailbox. You have reached this announcement
through your Personal Self-Subscribing Distribution List. To make
changes to
the types of announcements you wish to receive, please click on the
following URL:
***http://intranet.cdc.gov/maso/cdcAnnouncements/default.htm*<http://intranet.cdc.gov/maso/cdcAnnouncements/default.htm>,

enter your User ID and e-mail password (or LAN password if you have no
e-mail password) and make changes to the categories of announcements
which
interest you.
Back to top Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
14.
Call for Papers - for International Conference for Educators in San
Posted by: "rosanna.pittella" rosanna.-@yahoo.com   
rosanna.pittella
Tue Feb 5, 2008 11:14 am (PST)

http://www.elementalethics.com

Back to top Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
15.
NIEANEWS is online, check out the NIEA Blog and Summit Update! #Broa
Posted by: "NI-@niea.org" NI-@niea.org
Tue Feb 5, 2008 11:14 am (PST)

NIEA - National Indian Education Association
<http://www.niea.org> January 30, 2008
Broadcast #08-008 NCLB is Top Topic for Legislative Summit,
Q A at the NIEA Blog,
the Winter Issue of NIEANEWS is Online,
and There are Only 2 Days Left to Register for the Summit!


NIEA has been persistent with making positive changes to No Child
Left Behind, and will have collaborative impact with the help of
their attending participants to reinvigorate the education
conversation with Congress. As always, NIEA works with Congress
and the administration to support constructive changes to NCLB
that reflect our members' views about what works best for the
children the organization represents.

Meeting Annual Yearly Progress, school improvement and services
for students, Native languages and incorporation of Native
cultures to NCLB are the other important issues by NIEA. We also
want to secure the funding needed to get the job done.
For more… Go to Indian Country Today!...

[CLICK HERE!]
<http://www.indiancountry.com/content.cfm?id=1096416534>



Currently on the NIEA Blog…you are asking, Where are there
Teaching Jobs for Native People?, does anyone have examples of
how you would measure program success that reflect the values of
the host tribe/community? There are topics on Media Relations,
Grants, and new Opportunities.

Also, help become a NIEA Mentor. Start a dialog with a new
teacher. If you’re a student; help each other out. Exchange
information and know that the best part of NIEA is that we are
all here to help. Start a new topic today! This is available only
for our NIEA Members!
Forgot your password? Email membe-@niea.org
<mailto:membe-@niea.org> , log on and start Blogging!

[CLICK HERE!] <http://www.niea.org/membership/>



We have the new NIEANEWS winter issue online! In our NIEA
Member’s mailboxes soon, there is so much to read about with
continued information from the Hawaii Convention, new high school
information, NIEA Member Pila Wilson shares a great article, NIEA
Member Mary Anniagruk Sage shares very special events: Whaling
and Hunting in Alaska, and so much more…

[CLICK HERE!] <http://www.niea.org/media/newsletters.php>



Remember, there are only two more days to register for our 11th
Annual Legislative Summit at the Pre-registration rate. You can
still register, but it will be on-site rates, so please don’t
dely! There is a lot to learn at the Legislative Summit and this
is the best time to visit with your Congressperson and talk to
them about your education issues.

[REGISTER TODAY!]
<https://www.niea.org/events/summit_order.php>

Check out NIEA Today! www.niea.org
<http://www.niea.org/media/news_detail.php?id=58&catid=>
---------------------------------------
If you would like to be removed from our list-serve, please send
your request to ni-@niea.org <mailto:ni-@niea.org> .

<http://www.niea.org>



Back to top Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
16.
Teaching Disco Square Dancing to Our Elders: A Class Presentation
Posted by: "PR" ydel-@autrynationalcenter.org   yljdl
Tue Feb 5, 2008 11:14 am (PST)


Native Voices at the Autry presents a new play!

Teaching Disco Square Dancing to Our Elders: A Class Presentation by
Larissa FastHorse (Sicangu Nation)

Executive Producers: Randy Reinholz and Jean Bruce Scott
Directed by José Cruz González

Follow Kenny and Martin's adventure as they combine their school
projects into "Teaching Disco Square Dancing." The delicate
balance of their friendship is tested when they enlist the aid of
Kenny's Grandma and Amanda, a shy outcast whose presentation topic
is on cultural history. Can they work together to finish the project and
graduate from middle school, or will stereotypes and teen angst
undermine their determination? Bring the entire family and hang on for a
bumpy spin around the dance floor!

Recommended for family audiences.

February 8–March 2, 2008
Fridays & Saturdays: 8 pm. Saturdays & Sundays: 2 pm.
Student matinees: Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday: 11:30 am

Tickets: Autry Members $12 / General Admission $20 / Seniors, students,
and children ages 12 and under $12. With purchase of an Autry Member
adult ticket, receive one free child's ticket, age 12 or under.

Reservations: Call TicketWeb at 866.468.3399 or visit
http://www.ticketweb.com <http://www.ticketweb.com/>

Groups of 10 or more: Save 40%! Call 323.667.2000, ext. 354.
School groups: Call Janet Jung at 323.667.2000, ext. 336.

Autry National Center
4700 Western Heritage Way
Los Angeles, CA 90027
323.667.2000

http://www.autrynationalcenter.org <http://www.autrynationalcenter.org/>
http://www.nativevoicesattheautry.org
<http://www.nativevoicesattheautry.org/>
http://www.myspace.com/nativevoices
<http://www.myspace.com/nativevoices>

Back to top Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
17.
Professional Grant Proposal Writing Workshop (March 2008: Oklahoma C
Posted by: "Anthony Jones" in-@thegrantinstitute.com
Tue Feb 5, 2008 11:14 am (PST)


The Grant Institute's Grants 101: Professional Grant Proposal
Writing Workshop will be held at the University of Oklahoma
Health Sciences Center, March 19 - 21, 2008. Interested
development professionals, researchers, faculty, and graduate
students should register as soon as possible, as demand means
that seats will fill up quickly. Please forward, post, and
distribute this e-mail to your colleagues and listservs.



All participants will receive certification in professional grant
writing from the Institute. For more information call (888) 824 -
4424 or visit The Grant Institute at www.thegrantinstitute.com.



Please find the program description below:



The Grant Institute

Grants 101: Professional Grant Proposal Writing Workshop

will be held at the

University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

March 19 - 21, 2008

8:00 AM - 5:00 PM



The Grant Institute's Grants 101 course is an intensive and
detailed introduction to the process, structure, and skill of
professional proposal writing. This course is characterized by
its ability to act as a thorough overview, introduction, and
refresher at the same time. In this course, participants will
learn the entire proposal writing process and complete the course
with a solid understanding of not only the ideal proposal
structure, but a holistic understanding of the essential factors,
which determine whether or not a program gets funded. Through the
completion of interactive exercises and activities, participants
will complement expert lectures by putting proven techniques into
practice. This course is designed for both the beginner looking
for a thorough introduction and the intermediate looking for a
refresher course that will strengthen their grant acquisition
skills. This class, simply put, is designed to get results by
creating professional grant proposal writers.



Participants will become competent program planning and proposal
writing professionals after successful completion of the Grants
101 course. In three active and informative days, students will
be exposed to the art of successful grant writing practices, and
led on a journey that ends with a masterful grant proposal.



Grants 101 consists of three (3) courses that will be completed
during the three-day workshop.



(1) Fundamentals of Program Planning



This course is centered on the belief that "it's all about the
program." This intensive course will teach professional program
development essentials and program evaluation. While most grant
writing "workshops" treat program development and evaluation as
separate from the writing of a proposal, this class will teach
students the relationship between overall program planning and
grant writing.



(2) Professional Grant Writing



Designed for both the novice and experienced grant writer, this
course will make each student an overall proposal writing
specialist. In addition to teaching the basic components of a
grant proposal, successful approaches, and the do's and don'ts of
grant writing, this course is infused with expert principles that
will lead to a mastery of the process. Strategy resides at the
forefront of this course's intent to illustrate grant writing as
an integrated, multidimensional, and dynamic endeavor. Each
student will learn to stop writing the grant and to start writing
the story. Ultimately, this class will illustrate how each
component of the grant proposal represents an opportunity to use
proven techniques for generating support.



(3) Grant Research



At its foundation, this course will address the basics of
foundation, corporation, and government grant research. However,
this course will teach a strategic funding research approach that
encourages students to see research not as something they do
before they write a proposal, but as an integrated part of the
grant seeking process. Students will be exposed to online and
database research tools, as well as publications and directories
that contain information about foundation, corporation, and
government grant opportunities. Focusing on funding sources and
basic social science research, this course teaches students how
to use research as part of a strategic grant acquisition effort.



Registration

$597.00 tuition includes all materials and certificates.



Each student will receive:

*The Grant Institute Certificate in Professional Grant Writing

*The Grant Institute's Guide to Successful Grant Writing

*The Grant Institute Grant Writer's Workbook with sample
proposals, forms, and outlines



Registration Methods



1) On-Line - Complete the online registration form at
www.thegrantinstitute.com <http://www.thegrantinstitute.com/>
under Register Now. We'll send your confirmation by e-mail.



2) By Phone - Call (888) 824 - 4424 to register by phone. Our
friendly Program Coordinators will be happy to assist you and
answer your questions.



3) By E-mail - Send an e-mail with your name, organization, and
basic contact information to in-@thegrantinstitute.com
<mailto:in-@thegrantinstitute.com> and we will reserve your
slot and send your Confirmation Packet.



You have received this invitation due to specific educational
affiliation. We respect your privacy and want to ensure that
interested parties are made aware of The Grant Institute programs
and schedules. This is intended to be a one-time announcement. In
any event, you should not receive any more announcements unless
there is a program next year in your area. To be unlisted from
next year's announcement, send a blank e-mail to
unl-@thegrantinstitute.com
<mailto:unl-@thegrantinstitute.com> and write "Unlist" in the
subject line.




Back to top Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
18.
YOUTH STIPEND Bertha Wolf-Rosenthal Foundation Fund for Community Se
Posted by: "Alyssa Macy" alyss-@gmail.com
Tue Feb 5, 2008 11:14 am (PST)

*SGF community, for your information and action:*
**
*Subject:* Bertha Wolf-Rosenthal Foundation Fund for Community Service -
2008 Stipend Program

Dear Liberty Hill Foundation Grantee—

Attached are the guidelines and application for the *Bertha
Wolf-Rosenthal
Foundation Fund for Community Service – 2008 Stipend Program*. You may
also
download it from our website at:
http://www.libertyhill.org/grant/home.html.

*Complete application packets must be received in our office no later
than
5:00 p.m. on Thursday, March 6, 2008. Please refer to the guidelines and
application for full details. Questions may be emailed to us at
cl-@libertyhill.org.*
* *
*PLEASE DISTRIBUTE TO YOUR CONTACTS.*

The Bertha Wolf-Rosenthal Foundation Fund for Community Service Stipend,
a
program of the Liberty Hill Foundation, will provide up to five young
people
(ages 18-25 as of the end of December 2007) with a stipend of $5,000
each to
help cover basic living costs (e.g., rent, food, utilities,
transportation
and childcare) while they work at a nonprofit organization anywhere in
California during the 2008 calendar year.

*ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA*

To be considered for the Bertha Wolf-Rosenthal Foundation Fund for
Community
Service Stipend, applicants must meet all of the following criteria:

1. Show a history of community service work (in and/or out of school).

2. Demonstrate her/his financial need for supplementary income in the
absence of support from family and/or other outside resources. Please
note
that there is no particular threshold of financial need we are
considering.
It is up to the applicant to decide if she/he would be a competitive
applicant given her/his particular circumstances.

3. Currently work full-time (defined as 30+ hours/week) for a nonprofit
organization in California. Unpaid interns working 30+ hours/week for
the
entire year may also apply.

Carol Lee
Program Officer, Donor Advised & Restricted Funds

*Subscribe to our newsletter,
**www.libertyhill.org/involve*<http://www.libertyhill.org/involve>
*. ** *
Back to top Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
19.
Consolidated Indigenous Shadow Report to UN Committee on the Elimina
Posted by: "Alyssa Macy" native-@yahoo.com   nativeshare
Tue Feb 5, 2008 11:14 am (PST)

Contact: Alberto Saldamando
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
IITC General Counsel
Tel: (415) 641-4482
Email: albe-@treatycouncil.org

Consolidated Indigenous Shadow Report to United Nations Committee on
the Elimination of Racial Discrimination highlights Racism by United
States

February 5, 2008 – The International Indian Treaty Council (IITC), in
coordination with the Western Shoshone Defense Project, submitted a
Consolidated Indigenous Shadow Report to the United Nations Committee
on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (UNCERD) on January 6th,
2008. The UNCERD is the "Treaty Monitoring Body" for the
International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial
Discrimination (ICERD). It monitors compliance of the States
(countries) which have ratified the Convention with its provisions,
including the United States (US).

Submissions from Indigenous Peoples, tribes, organizations and
communities from around the country were included in the report. It
highlights a range of human rights violations and examples of racial
discrimination reported by Indigenous Peoples in the US. These
include the destruction of sacred sites, threats to spiritual and
cultural practices, environmental racism, violence against Indigenous
women, Homeland Security-promoted border and immigration policies,
Treaty rights violations, widespread discrimination in education,
health and prisoners' rights. Information was also included from
Indigenous Peoples in countries outside the US who are affected by US
policy. The report will be considered in the upcoming examination of
the US by the UNCERD in February in Geneva, Switzerland.

The UNCERD, during the review, will question US representatives on US
compliance with the Convention based on the US official report to the
Committee, called the Periodic Report. United Nations guidelines
require that governments consult with Non-Governmental Organizations
in their counties when they compile their Periodic Reports, but the US
has generally ignored this guideline. The Consolidated Indigenous
Report was submitted to ensure that the voices of Indigenous Peoples
would be heard during this examination.

Alberto Saldamando, IITC General Counsel, who co-coordinated the
development of the report stated, "In compiling this report to the
UNCERD, it was clear that the institutionalization of racism and
discrimination against Native Peoples is ingrained at every level of
US society. The data and the many inputs we received from Tribes,
Native Peoples and individuals vividly demonstrate that racial
discrimination thrives in schools, universities, prisons and in the
so-called administration of justice in the US, at every level of
government and society at large. Even in textbooks, Indigenous
Peoples in the US are reduced to caricatures with little humanity and
even fewer rights, particularly those rights recognized by the
recently adopted UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
We hope that the government and people of the US are willing to
correct the highly disproportionate impact of discrimination and
poverty on Native Peoples in the US, in keeping with the UN
Declaration. The international arena is one of the few spaces we have
to denounce the racial discrimination directed against us. At some
point it has to happen."

Julie Fischer, Western Shoshone Defense Project and co-coordinator of
report stated, "We are extremely pleased with the completion of the
Indigenous Joint Shadow Report. As we continue to move forward in
this long struggle, we are witnessing more and more native voices
coming forth and standing to be counted. The Report reflects those
voices and the commonality of the struggles of the indigenous peoples
of this Turtle Island. The Committee on the Elimination of Racial
Discrimination has been a strong force in the struggle of the Western
Shoshone and other indigenous people. With the information contained
in this Report, it is our hope to equip the Committee with the
information it needs to hold the United States and its multi national
corporations accountable to the rights of the first peoples and
respect for their traditional laws, lands and resources."

In recent years the UNCERD has made very important decisions upholding
Indigenous Peoples' Human Rights, in particular its General
Recommendation XIII which affirms Indigenous Peoples' Free Prior
Informed Consent in matters affecting them, and calls upon States to
uphold this right. The Western Shoshone Defense Project served as the
co-coordinators with IITC for the development of this Report, and has
successfully used the ICERD "Early Warning and Urgent Action
procedures" to raise questions challenging the legitimacy of the
Indian Land Claims Commission process and the purported "loss" of
their ancestral lands in violation of the Treaty of Ruby Valley. In
2006, the UNCERD issued a full Urgent Action decision stating in part
that the "Committee has received credible information alleging that
the Western Shoshone Indigenous Peoples are being denied their
traditional rights to land, and that the measures taken and even
accelerated lately by the State party in relation to the status, use
and occupation of these lands may cumulatively lead to irreparable
harm to these communities."

Carrie Dann, Western Shoshone Nation elder and spokesperson, stated
following the 2006 decision, ""We are very pleased with the UNCERD's
decision against the United States. Hopefully, the United States will
begin to address its poor history with the Indigenous Peoples and
begin to act in a more honest and good faith manner. The struggle of
the Western Shoshone Nation is the struggle of all Indigenous Peoples.
It is not just about abuse of power and economics – it is about the
stripping away of our spirit… The UNCERD decision confirms what the
Western Shoshone and other Indigenous Peoples have been saying for a
very long time - it is a first step that we can use in our ongoing
work and in our corporate engagement and public education strategies.
We also hope this decision and the Western Shoshone struggle can be
used to encourage and strengthen other peoples' struggles to protect
their spirituality, the lands, resources and their rights as
Indigenous Peoples."

The UNCERD has responded very positively to Indigenous Peoples' recent
submissions regarding New Zealand and Canada as well. Alberto
Saldamando, IITC General Counsel, and IITC Board member Lenny Foster
(Dineh Nation) will attend the UNCERD session in Geneva and present
the Report. The Western Shoshone and representatives from other Tribal
Nations and organizations are also planning to attend. Indigenous
Peoples around the country are eagerly waiting for the UNCERD's
response to their submissions.

The UNCERD currently has one Indigenous expert member, Francisco Cali,
Maya Kaqchikel from Guatemala, who was just re-elected to another
4-year term by the state (country) parties to the Convention at the UN
General Assembly session on January 17th.

The "Consolidated Indigenous Shadow Report to the UNCERD on the United
States" can be downloaded at www.treatycouncil.org.

# # #

Back to top Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
20a.
Native Voices: Contemporary Indigenous Art comes to Brooklyn - openi
Posted by: "Raquel" roxyr-@yahoo.com   roxyrocky
Tue Feb 5, 2008 11:14 am (PST)

You are cordially invited to:

Native Voices: Contemporary Indigenous Art
Kentler International Drawing Space
February 8 – March 23, 2008
Opening reception: February 8, 6–9 pm
Curator/Artist Talk: March 1, 4:00 pm
Curators: Raquel Chapa and Deborah Everett

Native Voices comprises three exhibitions of contemporary Native work.
The exhibitions
offer a rare opportunity for the New York public to engage with the work
of contemporary
Native artists from Canada and across the U.S.

The work will be shown at:

Kentler International Drawing Space
353 Van Brunt St., Red Hook, Brooklyn, 11231
Salena and Humanities Galleries
Long Island University/Brooklyn Campus

FiveMyles
http://www.fivemyles.org

A flier for the exhibition can be found at:
http://www.riveredgedesign.net/kentler/2.html

Please join us!

Back to top Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (2)
20b.
Native Voices: Contemporary Indigenous Art comes to Brooklyn - openi
Posted by: "Raquel Chapa" raquel-@gmail.com
Tue Feb 5, 2008 11:14 am (PST)

You are cordially invited to:

Native Voices: Contemporary Indigenous Art
Kentler International Drawing Space
February 8 – March 23, 2008
Opening reception: February 8, 6–9 pm
Curator/Artist Talk: March 1, 4:00 pm
Curators: Raquel Chapa and Deborah Everett

Native Voices comprises three exhibitions of contemporary Native work.
The exhibitions offer a rare opportunity for the New York public to
engage with the work of contemporary Native artists from Canada and
across the U.S.

The work will be shown at:

Kentler International Drawing Space
353 Van Brunt St., Red Hook, Brooklyn, 11231
Salena and Humanities Galleries
Long Island University/Brooklyn Campus

FiveMyles
http://www.fivemyles.org

A flier for the exhibition can be found at:
http://www.riveredgedesign.net/kentler/2.html

Please join us!

Amalia Córdova
Latin American Program Manager
Film + Video Center
Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian
1 Bowling Green, New York, NY 10004
Tel: +1 212-514-3735
Fax: +1 212-514-3725
Email: cord-@si.edu
www.nativenetworks.si.edu / www.redesindigenas.si.edu

Back to top Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (2)
21.
American Indian Studies 2008 Conference
Posted by: "Nicole Bowman" nbow-@nbowmanconsulting.com   nbowman01
Tue Feb 5, 2008 11:14 am (PST)



From: nativeprofs--@uwm.edu
[mailto:nativeprofs--@uwm.edu] On Behalf Of michael
Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2008 4:40 PM
To: nativep-@uwm.edu
Subject: [Nativeprofs-list] FW: AIS 2008 Conference

_____

From: Sharel Hailey [mailto:Sharel.-@asu.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2008 4:37 PM
To: nativeprofs--@uwm.edu
Cc: Carol Lujan; James Riding In
Subject: AIS 2008 Conference

Hello,

Agenda for American Indian Studies Conference 2008 is attached.

Thank you

Back to top Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
22.
EEOP Newsletter, Volume 3, Issue 4
Posted by: "Mansel Nelson" mansel.-@nau.edu
Tue Feb 5, 2008 11:14 am (PST)

EEOP Newsletter, Volume 3, Issue 4

This newsletter contains information about:

*_Summer Scholars 08_*

*_Preparation for College - Summer Programs_*

*_Recruitment for the 2008 Student Summer Internship (SSI) Program_*

*_Preparation for a Career - Internships_*

*_Job Satisfaction -- What makes us happy?_*

Hot Air from EEOP -- /A Newsletter/

Environmental Education Outreach Program (EEOP) Web
version @

Volume 3, Issue 4 (January
2008)
http://www.nau.edu/eeop/newsletter

*_The Newsletter_*

This newsletter is a service of the Institute for Tribal Environmental
Professionals (ITEP) Environmental Education Outreach Program (EEOP).
The EEOP staff created this newsletter for K-16 students, educators, and

tribal professionals that are interested in learning more about
environmental issues with an emphasis on air quality. This issue of the
newsletter will focus on opportunities for this summer. Now is the time
to make your summer plans. How about an internship or a summer
program? The EEOP staff is interested in helping you with either one.

.

*_Summer Scholars 08_*

The EEOP Summer Scholars has provided a valuable educational experience
for Native American students in middle school and high school since
1999. Last year we were only able to plan and complete one week of
Summer Scholars. Thanks to the Arizona Science Foundation we have
funding for five sessions this year.

The Summer Scholars program provides Native American students a
one-week, on-campus pre-college experience with emphasis in applied
mathematics, science, and technology focusing on local environmental
issues. One goal of Summer Scholars is to make students aware of
opportunities that exist after high school. Students are encouraged to
consider mathematics, science, and technology careers that require
post-secondary education.

The topic for Summer Scholars 2008 will be "Creating Sustainability in
Schools." Students will work on one of four taskforces: Energy
Taskforce, Water Taskforce, Building Taskforce, or the Transportation
Taskforce. A major focus throughout the week will be to look at ways in
which schools can reduce air pollution, including carbon dioxide. Each
taskforce will develop recommendations for their school district on how
to save money and reduce the environmental impact of their school
operations.

The premise for this summer is: "If your school was given a million
dollar budget to renovate your school, with the goal of making it more
sustainable, how will you use this money to reduce operating costs, and
prevent pollution production. Ultimately the savings should be used to
repay the million dollars, allowing the funding to be passed to another
school for a similar purpose. In other words how would you use a
Perpetual Green School Fund?"

Students will be looking at the current costs of lighting,
transportation, heating and cooling, and building maintenance costs.
Through hands-on experimentation, field trips, guest lectures, and
problem based learning students will look at alternative methods to
reduce these costs, figure out the long term savings, while taking into
account environmental impacts for the changes. The students will be
challenged to find sustainable alternatives that result in cost savings,

while protecting the environment. The EEOP staff anticipates that the
Summer Scholars will take their recommendations and ideas back to their
school and present their findings to the school board and school staff.

The EEOP staff will continue working with the Summer Scholars and
educators during the school year to see if any simple inexpensive
changes can be made in the school operations to reduce the carbon
footprint of the school. For example, with the permission of the school
administration, the students could do an energy audit and water audit on

their school building, looking for ways to start saving money and
promote sustainability.

*The EEOP staff is currently recruiting schools to participate in the
Summer Scholars 2008 program. If your school is interested, please
contact Matthew or Mansel.*

*_Preparation for College - Summer Programs_*

What can students do, if they don't participate in the EEOP Summer
Scholars? Well, there are lots of other opportunities. The EEOP staff
encourages all middle school and high school students to consider
participating in academic summer programs. There are many programs that
can benefit students. For specific information on a variety of programs
you can join the EEOP list-serve. You could also start your search for
programs at the following websites.

* http://www.petersons.com/
* http://www.mysummercamps.com/
* http://www.kidscamps.com/

Now is the time to be making plans for the summer. If you want help
with finding an academic summer program in science or engineering,
contact the EEOP staff.

_ _

*_Recruitment for the 2008 Student Summer Internship (SSI) Program_*

The EEOP staff would like to thank all of those organizations that
submitted internship host site applications for the 2008 summer
internship program. We received many wonderful project proposals and we
wish we had the funding to support all of the air quality efforts in
Indian Country. You can visit the EEOP website to see a listing of the
possible host sites.

The EEOP staff is actively recruiting interns for Summer 2008. The
deadline for student intern applications is Feb 15^th . After the 15^th
, the EEOP staff will begin the process of placing an intern with each
of the selected host sites. We anticipate having many more qualified
interns than we are able to place. However, we are interested in
finding all interested students an opportunity that meets their needs.

If your organization has an opening for a seasonal summer position we
would like to promote these opportunities with our highly qualified
intern applicants. Please send a simple job description with contact
information to Matthew via email.

Once we have completed this summer's intern program, we will begin
working on next summer. If you would like more information about the
Summer Student Internship (SSI) program please contact Matthew or visit
the EEOP website.

*_Preparation for a Career - Internships_*

What can students do, if they don't participate in the Student Summer
Internship (SSI)? Well, there are lots of other opportunities. The
EEOP staff encourages all college students to consider participating in
an internship. There are many programs that can benefit college
students. For specific information on a variety of programs you can
join the EEOP list-serve. You could also start your search for programs
at the following websites.

* http://www.tech-interns.com/
* http://www.aises.org/highered/internships/
* http://www.qem.org/internship.htm

Now is the time to be making plans for the summer. If you want help
with finding an internship in science or engineering, contact the EEOP
staff.

*_ _*

*_Job Satisfaction -- What makes us happy?_*

A significant part of the EEOP programs is to help students be aware of
various careers and to prepare for those careers. We encourage students
to consider careers that match their aptitude and interests; however
these alone are not enough to be happy on the job. Most experts say
that job satisfaction begins with appreciation and respect, not salary
and perks. When evaluating a potential employer, salary is certainly
one of many considerations, but salary will not make you happy by
itself. So what does make us happy?

"Study after study has shown that it is the small things that make
workers feel committed to an organization," says Barbara Glanz, an
author specializing in workplace issues. She goes on to say that, "One
study shows the top three things workers want are interesting work, full

appreciation for the work they do, and a feeling of being in on things."

The EEOP staff would encourage everyone looking for employment to
carefully investigate the "climate" of their potential place of
employment. When you go to an interview, you should also be conducting
your own interview of the prospective employer. It would also be a good
idea to interview other employees to learn more about your potential
employer. According to the experts, there are seven things you should
consider and evaluate. The EEOP staff would also encourage all
supervisors to also review the seven concepts that the experts find
important for employee happiness and success.

_Appreciation._ Praise heads the list for many workers in the search
for happiness. Many supervisors go out of their way to let employees
know what they have done wrong, but don't bother to congratulate or
praise them for success. Praise doesn't cost much, but it makes a big
difference. (This is probably true for students in a school environment
as well.)

_Respect._ Another important factor in keeping employees happy is
treating them with fairness and respect. Even simple or spontaneous
rewards make a difference. A thank you or a short note can mean a lot.
Pamela Skillings, a career coach, explained that, "She finds that job
dissatisfaction escalates when employees are not treated with respect or

feel that their work is not appreciated." Andrea Kay, a career
consultant, finds that respecting employees' ideas and time, as well as
their ability to make decisions and be creative, makes them want to
stay.

_Trust._ Along with respect comes trust. Terry Bacon, author of "What
People Want", found in a national survey that employees rank honesty,
fairness, and trust as their top three needs.

_Individual Growth_. People want the opportunity to grow and learn on
the job. The desire for opportunities to grow and learn on the job is
particularly true for Generation Y (18 to 30 year old employees). They
desire to receive training, take on new challenges, and expand their
capabilities.

_A Good Boss_. Bosses play a key factor in determining a worker's
happiness factor. A national survey done by Yahoo! Hotjobs found that
people don't leave companies, they leave bosses. Tom Musbach, managing
editor of Yahoo! Hotjobs explained that if bosses aren't honest with
workers, don't listen to them, and don't care about them, employees
either leave or become disengaged in their work.

_Compatible Co-workers._ A close second to a "Good Boss" is working
with people they enjoy. Respecting co-workers for their knowledge and
experience, as well as for their ethics creates a better place to work.
In addition to compatible co-workers, people want recognition of the
family and work connection. Employees need as much flexibility as
possible. When the role of the family is recognized at work, employees
work harder and they are happier.

_A Sense of Purpose._ Career Counselors emphasize the importance of
doing something you love and having a sense of purpose. Most people
find happiness when they feel connected to the core purpose of the
organization.

The EEOP staff is available to make presentations to high school and
college students about preparing for a successful career in science,
technology, and engineering.

*_Future Issues_*

We are interested in articles sharing stories from students, teachers,
or tribal professionals influenced by ITEP or EEOP activities. If you
would like to be published in our newsletter, send Mansel your proposed
article.

*_Credits and Contacts_*

The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Office of Air and
Radiation provides part of the funding to make this newsletter
possible. The newsletter is disseminated on various list serves,
however, if you would like to join the newsletter list serve, contact
Mansel.

*_ _*

Our staff looks forward to providing new services and developing new
programs, as well as continuing existing programs. We especially look
forward to hearing from you. So please visit our website at
http://www.nau.edu/eeop or contact us via telephone or email.

Mansel A.
Nelson
Matthew Zierenberg

928 523
1275
928 523 8864

mansel.-@nau.edu
<mailto:mansel.-@nau.edu>
matthew.z-@nau.edu <mailto:matthew.z-@nau.edu>

--

/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/
Mansel A. Nelson
Program Coordinator Voice 928 523 1275
Environmental Education Outreach Program Fax 928 523 1280
Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals mansel.-@nau.edu
PO Box 5768
Northern Arizona University Peterson Hall
Flagstaff, AZ 86011 Bldg 22, Room 208
http://www.nau.edu/eeop/
*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/

"We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors, we borrow it from our
children." Native American Proverb

*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/

Back to top Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
23.
FCC RELEASES AGENDA FOR JANUARY 31, 2008: DIGITAL TELEVISION CONSUME
Posted by: "Alyssa Macy" alyss-@gmail.com
Tue Feb 5, 2008 11:14 am (PST)

Good morning, FYI about the workshop
I am working on getting the message about the conversion to digital
television to Indian Country. I want to make sure that Indian Country
know
about this transisiton that impact the whole Country. Please let me know
if
you have opportunities to set out informational material about the
transisiton. Thanks
------------------------------

For Immediate Release:
News Media Contact:

January 28, 2008
Rosemary Kimball
at (202) 418-0511

e-mail: rosemary-@fcc.gov

* *

*FCC RELEASES AGENDA FOR JANUARY 31, 2008*

*DIGITAL TELEVISION CONSUMER EDUCATION WORKSHOP*

*FOCUSING ON CONSUMERS IN RURAL AREAS AND ON TRIBAL LANDS*

*Washington, DC* -- The Commission has released the agenda for its
Digital
Television Consumer Education Workshop focusing on consumers in rural
areas
and on tribal lands to be held Thursday, January 31, 2008, at FCC
Headquarters, 445 12th St., SW, Washington, DC, in the Commission
Meeting
Room. It will begin at 9:00 a.m. and end at approximately 12:00 p.m.

The purpose of the Workshop is to provide an opportunity for interested
parties to discuss the challenges associated with ensuring that
consumers in
rural areas and on tribal lands receive and can act on information
regarding
the upcoming Digital Television transition. The Workshop discussion will
also explore ways to develop coordinated consumer education activities.
There will also be a demonstration of digital-to-analog converter boxes.
An
agenda for the Workshop is attached.

A live webcast of the hearing will be available at the FCC's website at
http://www.fcc.gov/realaudio/ on a first-come, first-served basis.
During
the Workshop, the public can e-mail questions for the panelists to
dtvwor-@fcc.gov.

Reasonable accommodations for people with disabilities are available
upon
request. Requests should be submitted as soon as possible, and include a
description of the accommodation you will need with as much detail as
possible. Also include a way we can contact you if we need more
information. Send an e-mail to fcc-@fcc.gov or call the Consumer and
Governmental Affairs Bureau at 202-418-0530 (voice), 202-418-0432 (tty).

For more information about the Workshop, please contact Pam
Slipakoff at (202) 418-7705, pam.sli-@fcc.gov, or Lauren Patrich at
(202) 418-7944, lauren.-@fcc.gov.

-- FCC --

*FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION*

*DIGITAL TELEVISION CONSUMER EDUCATION WORKSHOP*

*FOCUSING ON CONSUMERS IN RURAL AREAS AND ON TRIBAL LANDS*

* *

*FCC Headquarters*

*445 12th Street, SW, Washington, DC 20554*

*Commission Meeting Room*

* *

*January 31, 2008*

* *

*AGENDA*

* *

*8:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Pre-Program Demonstrations of
Digital-to-Analog Converter Boxes*

*
*

*9:00 a.m. – 9:15 a.m. Welcome*

* *FCC Commissioner Jonathan
S. Adelstein

* **
*

*9:15 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. How to Reach and Provide Support on the DTV
Transition to Consumers on Tribal Lands *

* *

*Moderator: *Catherine W. Seidel, Chief, FCC Consumer and Governmental
Affairs Bureau

* *

*Roundtable Participants:*

Raymond D. Apodaca, Division of Tribal TANF Management, Office of Family
Assistance Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of
Health and Human Services

Geoffrey C. Blackwell, Director, Strategic Relations and Minority
Business
Development, Chickasaw Nation Industries, Inc. (representing the
National
Congress of American Indians)

Francis Dunne, CPM, Office of Indian Energy and Economic
Development/Office
of the Asst. Secretary,

U.S. Department of the Interior

Craig L. Lewis, Federal Project Officer, Employment and Training
Administration, Indian and Native American Programs, U.S. Department of
Labor

Loriene Roy, President, American Library Association

Georgeline Sparks, Chief, American Indian/Alaska Native Program Branch,
Office of Headstart, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Deswood Tome, Director of Communications and Commis-sioner for the
Navajo
Nation Telecommunications Commission, Navajo Nation

*10:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.* *Break*

*Attendees are encouraged to view the digital-to-analog converter box
demonstrations. *

* *

*10:45 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. How to Reach and Provide Support to Rural
Consumers on the DTV Transition *

* *

*Moderator: *Catherine W. Seidel, Chief, FCC Consumer and Governmental
Affairs Bureau

* *

*Roundtable Participants:*

* *

Commissioner Sharon Gillett, Massachusetts Department of
Telecommunications
and Cable

Tracy Grondine, Director of Media Relations, American Farm Bureau

Erik Johnston, Associate Legislative Director, National Association of
Counties

Dr. Cathann Kress, Director for National 4-H Headquarters

* *

Harry Roesch, Senior Telecommunications Advisor, Program Operations
Division, Appalachian Regional Commission

Leroy Watson, Legislative Director, National Grange of the Order of the
Patrons of Husbandry

Larry Persily, Associate Director, Office of Alaska Governor Sarah Palin

*12:00p.m. – 12:15 p.m. Wrap Up*

*12:15 p.m. – 12:45 p.m. Demonstrations Continue*

* *

* *

* *

*2*
Back to top Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
Messages in this topic (1)
RECENT ACTIVITY
3
New Members
Visit Your Group
John McEnroe
on Yahoo! Groups
Join him for the
10 Day Challenge.
Do-It-Yourselfers
Find Y! Groups
on Lawn & garden,
homes and autos.
Weight Loss Group
on Yahoo! Groups
Get support and
make friends online.
Need to Reply?
Click one of the "Reply" links to respond to a specific message in the
Daily Digest.
Create New Topic | Visit Your Group on the Web
Messages
**You are welcome to reprint, copy, archive, quote or re-post this item,
but please retain the original and listserv source*

If you have any questions or comments regarding this service, please do
not hesitate to contact NativeShare at Native-@yahoo.com. If you are
receiving this as a forwarded message, please join the list serve by
sending an email to: NativeShare-@yahoogroups.com

Moderated by Alyssa Macy
	
 Previous Message All Messages Next Message 
  Check It Out!

  Topica Channels
 Best of Topica
 Art & Design
 Books, Movies & TV
 Developers
 Food & Drink
 Health & Fitness
 Internet
 Music
 News & Information
 Personal Finance
 Personal Technology
 Small Business
 Software
 Sports
 Travel & Leisure
 Women & Family

  Start Your Own List!
Email lists are great for debating issues or publishing your views.
Start a List Today!

© 2001 Topica Inc. TFMB
Concerned about privacy? Topica is TrustE certified.
See our Privacy Policy.