Welcome Guest!
 SouthernHeritage
 Previous Message All Messages Next Message 
Southern Heritage News & Views  Charles Demastus
 May 20, 2002 02:48 PDT 

--part1_45.17a66e3a.2a1a2033_boundary
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit


From:   oldsout-@zebra.net


To Monika:

An excellent account of the socialist despots in GA who continue to usurp the
constitution just as Lincoln bin laden did!!!

But the bottom line here is that the Southern people are still suffering from
the
"battered wife" syndrome.......they have beat us up for sooooo long that they
have us believing that we deserve it and furthermore, we should be
sooooooooo grateful for every little crumb they throw out to us!!!

God save us from our own who believe we deserve to continue to be vilified
and our very existence continued to be threatened by cultural genocide!!!

Ya'll keep up the good work in GA .......RESISTANCE AGAINST
TYRANNY!!!!!

Confederately yours,
Pat Godwin in Zimbabwe on de Alabamy
(Selma, AL)


            *****************


Douglas     

From:   escol-@attbi.com     


Mrs. Jones reply to violation in Douglas, GA.
FYI,
Lijah

From: "Monika Junghans-Jones"
Mr. Coleman, it certainly is not my intention to put any division among
anybody. But this has to be addressed. First of all, none of us blocked the
side walk. And we were out here "doing our duty" rather then entertaining
with the officers the whole time. I came to this country in 1971, I studied
the Constitution, the book "Dynamic Freedom" is right in front of me, given
to me the day I was naturalized in 1989, after being drilled for over 2
hours in Atlanta by a INS Agent on this document before I would get a
passing "yes-you now can become a citizen". The Constitution that I have
tells me, that "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishlement of
religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the
freedom of speech, or of the press; o the right of the peole peaceably to
assemble, and to petition the government for redress of grievances. This
means that I have to have no registration, or licensing or permit to
express these rights, for indeed this was a peacable assembly, and the
reason I highlighted the word "Protest" is that I disagree with using this
word and having it all over the press as such. When we assemble to make a
stand for truth and our rights, it should be called just that - a gathering
of people expressing their right under the law of the land. Any law that
contradicts has to be nullified. May I remind everybody that that "The
evils of tyranny are rarely seen but by him who resists it." - John Hay
(1872). I often wonder what Patrick Henry would say and do if he were
around today. I think I know the answer to this one without even thinking
twice. I am not a politician, I don't know how to compromise and I hope I
never learn. Any infringement on a citizens right is important enough to
speak out on, for silence will not make things better, but worse. Feel free
to pass my comment on, for I can take critizism very well, doesn't bother
me in the least. It wouldn't be the first time and I am sure it is not
going to be the last time. For Christ - for Christendom - there will be no
King but Jesus -
Monika Junghans-Jones, Psalm 139!!!
PS: By the way, my husband was upset about the way this whole situation in
Douglas with these officers was handled. He just shook his head and said
"no wonder we are not getting anywheres. We let the law tell us what we can
and can't do even so the law itself is "Lawless"."

<<<<


Elijah S. Coleman
<A HREF="http://www.southernmessenger.org/flag_poles.htm">http://www.southernmessenger.org/flag_poles.htm</A>


            *****************


From:   nwal-@carol.net   


CELTS IN NEW ZEALAND 300s and 1200s AD -- history suppressed by
government!
Has exciting links to "New Zealand, a Celtic Country" etc.
<A HREF="http://www.zealand.org.nz/history.htm">http://www.zealand.org.nz/history.htm</A>



/\/.\/\/. ADDS TO THE DISCUSSION OF THOMAS GOODE JONES CAMP
SCV AND THE MONTGOMERY CITY SEAL:

The following webpage is a most interesting window on Alabama history, the
true legacy of Gov. Thomas Goode Jones, and the present day.

<A HREF="http://www.bu.edu/historic/abstracts/Abstract-Aucoin.htm">http://www.bu.edu/historic/abstracts/Abstract-Aucoin.htm</A>

Here is an instance of a major New England university having a conference
on Gov. Jones and the post-War period through 1914. It seems clear that
Gov. Jones was a down-to-earth reformer who took the needs of both blacks
and whites quite seriously after the War and into the early part of the
20th century. His approach dissapointed both "Radical Republicans" and
"Yellow Dog Democrats" of the day, but he certainly would not have approved
the concept of "civil rights" which prevails at this time and drives
propaganda offensives such as the one before us.
    The Governor's son, Judge Walter B. Jones, was my grandfather's second
cousin. He compiled a collection of "Confederate War Poems" which is still
sold in our circles. He fought the NAACP from the bench during the "civil
rights" era itself and in effect decreed that no matter what was happening
in the streets of Montgomery or any other city there would be no "civil
rights" revolution in his courtroom -- meaning of course radical black
militant terror tactics, the real-world definition of "civil rights" as we
have come to know it in the age of Black Panthers, Jesse Jackson and
"Affirmative Action". Judge Jones's heroic story is partly told in the
liberally-slanted book FIFTY-EIGHT LONELY MEN.

Judge Jones has been widely regarded as the true heir to the T.G. Jones
tradition of Americanism. Among his other accomplishments he wrote a
regular column in the Montgy. Advertiser. Below is a sample from 40 years
ago which shows from yet another angle what the "civil rights" revolution
which the war on the Montgy. city seal is really all about. I would like to
challenge anyone in favor of redefining the city of Montgomery in "civil
rights" terms to demonstrate that the Judge, the Governor or any other of
their illustrious line would likely have agreed with it (including TGJ's
father, Samuel Goode Jones, a pioneer railroad builder of the South). . . .
. .

* * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Off the Bench"

(column by Judge Jones ca. 1960)

    The killing in a Montgomery cemetery near Troy on May 23, last, of a
43-year-old man who walked into an Ozark bank and murdered in cold blood
two bank officials and who later on murdered a policeman, brought death to
a man who richly deserved it.
    As we read in the newspaper accounts of his attempt to rob the bank and
of
his three murders, we are reminded that at the Common Law, and Alabama is
largely a Common Law state, there was a thing called "hue and cry." This
was a loud outcry with which robbers and murderers were anciently pursued,
and which all who heard it were bound to take up and join in the pursuit
until the criminal was taken. If the murderer cannot otherwise be taken, he
may be killed. And so this pursuit of the Ozark murderer and bank robber
was something like the old "hue and cry" of the Common Law. The officers of
the law, and those who aided them, and who risked their lives to capture
the murderer deserve the commendation and praise of all law-abiding citizens.
    There is another thought which comes to me in this connection and it is
that the killing of this murderer will save Alabama many, many thousands of
dollars in prosecuting him had he lived and will save the people of the
state all the hysterics and sobbing which go with the trial of a murderer
under our present system of Alabama law.
    If the Ozark murderer had lived and been put on trial for his crimes, it
would have been several years, even if then, before he could have been
executed.
    Every technicality known to the law -- and there are thousands of them --
would have been invoked in favor of the murderer. First of all, he would
have to be indicted by a grand jury and this might take two or three
months. Then if he were indicted and arraigned for his crimes, the grand
jury which indicted him would be under attack and the indictment itself
would have been carefully scanned to be certain that every "t" was crossed
and every "i" was dotted.
    If these hurdles were overcome, then there would be the selection of a
trial jury and this would be a long, drawn-out affair. The state would pay
lawyers to defend the murderer and it would get all the witnesses for him.
Then, at the trial, the defendant would not have to take the stand. If he
did not, the lawyers for the state could not comment on the fact that the
defendant was afraid to take the stand. The chances are, the defendant
would avail himself of the worst abused plea in the criminal law -- insanity.
    Days would be spent tracing the life of the murderer from his earliest
days and all sorts of evidence would be introduced to prove that he was of
unsound mind. If the case got to the jury, then every one of the jurors,
all 12, would have to agree on a verdict of guilty.
    If the jury found the defendant guilty and fixed his punishment of death,
then there would be all kinds of motions for a new trial, and claims would
be made of newly discovered evidence and the trrial judge would be charged
with scores of mistakes of law in the conduct of the trial. If the motion
for a new trial were denied then there would be one appeal after another
and by this time maybe 18 months would have dragged by.
    As a matter of fact, even though the defendant did not take the stand in
his behalf, even though all he made was a formal plea of not guilty, the
law would take an appeal for him, this under an Alabama statute passed in
1943 which provides that in any case where the death penalty sentence is
imposed, it shall be the duty of the trial judge immediately after the
imposition of sentence to enter in the record an order, with or without the
election of the defendant, that the defendant appeals from the judgment of
conviction. Thereupon, the sentence shall be automatically suspended; and
then if the defendant is without means the state will pay all the costs of
his appeal and the lawyers appointed to prosecute his appeal will be paid
by the State of Alabama the sum not in excess of $250.
    If the State Supreme Court upholds the conviction, then will come a
motion
for rehearing and additional time will be killed. If the court finally
denies the rehearing, then the murderer will go into the federal courts and
set up all sorts of claims that in the state court he was denied the equal
protection of the laws and due process of law. There is no telling how many
appeals would be made to the federal courts. The Rosenberg traitors had 17
appeals and Carol Chessman, the California murderer, had 16 appeals. All
the while the months dragged slowly by. Finally, if all court proceedings
are completed and the matter finally gets into the governor's hands there
are all sorts of appeals for clemency, and maybe one reprieve after another
will be given the condemned; and, finally, maybe, after three or four
years, the murderer will be executed.
    In all of these legal proceedings practically every question will be
discussed except the guilt of the defendant. The state would spend
thousands of dollars helping the defendant escape justice. It would do
nothing on earth for the murderer's victims. There would be no
appropriations to help families bury their dead and there would be no state
funds given to take the place of the dead breadwinners. All the state's
money would go to defend the murderer, one who killed in cold blood, one
who deliberately planned all his actions and who had never really denied
his crime. Alabama criminal laws all favor the defendant. A criminal gets
all the breaks and no wonder crime continues to increase.


            *****************


From:   mca6-@bellsouth.net   


General Lee surrendered and then General Joseph Johnson after which General
Waite signed papers to cease hostilities.

If I am not mistaken, General Lee was the superintendent at West Point when
Cadet U.S. Grant attended but both saw action in the Mexican war along with
President Jefferson Davis.

Jerry Wingate
SCV Camp 1629 Chattahochee Guards


            ****************


Snowball-toting Rebels raid camp
<A HREF="http://www.telegram.com/news/valley/scivilwarb.html">http://www.telegram.com/news/valley/scivilwarb.html</A>


Main Street Gettysburg
<A HREF="http://www.mainstreetgettysburg.org/msgsales.htm?50,26">http://www.mainstreetgettysburg.org/msgsales.htm?50,26</A>





--part1_45.17a66e3a.2a1a2033_boundary
Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

<HTML>


<FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=2><BR>
From:   oldsout-@zebra.net <BR>
<BR>
<BR>
To Monika:<BR>
<BR>
An excellent account of the socialist despots in GA who continue to usurp the<BR>
constitution just as Lincoln bin laden did!!!<BR>
<BR>
But the bottom line here is that the Southern people are still suffering from the<BR>
"battered wife" syndrome.......they have beat us up for sooooo long that they<BR>
have us believing that we deserve it and furthermore, we should be<BR>
sooooooooo grateful for every little crumb they throw out to us!!!<BR>
<BR>
God save us from our own who believe we deserve to continue to be vilified<BR>
and our very existence continued to be threatened by cultural genocide!!! <BR>
<BR>
Ya'll keep up the good work in GA .......RESISTANCE AGAINST<BR>
TYRANNY!!!!!<BR>
<BR>
Confederately yours,<BR>
Pat Godwin in Zimbabwe on de Alabamy<BR>
(Selma, AL)<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
            *****************<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
Douglas     <BR>
<BR>
From:   escol-@attbi.com     <BR>
<BR>
<BR>
Mrs. Jones reply to violation in Douglas, GA.<BR>
FYI,<BR>
Lijah<BR>
<BR>
From: "Monika Junghans-Jones"  <BR>
Mr. Coleman, it certainly is not my intention to put any division among<BR>
anybody. But this has to be addressed. First of all, none of us blocked the<BR>
side walk. And we were  out here "doing our duty" rather then entertaining<BR>
with the officers the whole time. I came to this country in 1971, I studied<BR>
the Constitution, the book "Dynamic Freedom" is right in front of me, given<BR>
to me the day I was naturalized in 1989, after being drilled for over 2<BR>
hours in Atlanta by a INS Agent on this document before I would get a<BR>
passing "yes-you now can become a citizen". The Constitution that I have<BR>
tells me, that "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishlement of<BR>
religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the<BR>
freedom of speech, or of the press; o the right of the peole peaceably to<BR>
assemble, and to petition the government for redress of grievances. This<BR>
means that I have to have no registration, or licensing or permit to<BR>
express these rights, for indeed this was a peacable assembly, and the<BR>
reason I highlighted the word  "Protest" is that I disagree with using this<BR>
word and having it all over the press as such. When we assemble to make a<BR>
stand for truth and our rights, it should be called just that - a gathering<BR>
of people expressing their right under the law of the land. Any law that<BR>
contradicts has to be nullified. May I remind everybody that  that "The<BR>
evils of tyranny are rarely seen but by him who resists it." - John Hay<BR>
(1872).  I often wonder what Patrick Henry would say and do if he were<BR>
around today. I think I know the answer to this one without even thinking<BR>
twice. I am not a politician, I don't know how to compromise and I hope I<BR>
never learn. Any infringement on a citizens right is important enough to<BR>
speak out on, for silence will not make things better, but worse. Feel free<BR>
to pass my comment on, for I can take critizism very well, doesn't bother<BR>
me in the least. It wouldn't be the first time and I am sure it is not<BR>
going to be the last time.  For Christ - for Christendom - there will be no<BR>
King but Jesus -  <BR>
Monika Junghans-Jones, Psalm 139!!!<BR>
PS: By the way, my husband was upset about the way this whole situation in<BR>
Douglas with these officers was handled. He just shook his head and said<BR>
"no wonder we are not getting anywheres. We let the law tell us what we can<BR>
and can't do even so the law itself is "Lawless"."<BR>
<BR>
<<<<<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
Elijah S. Coleman<BR>
<A HREF="http://www.southernmessenger.org/flag_poles.htm">http://www.southernmessenger.org/flag_poles.htm</A><BR>
<BR>
<BR>
            *****************<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
From:   nwal-@carol.net   <BR>
<BR>
<BR>
CELTS IN NEW ZEALAND 300s and 1200s AD -- history suppressed by<BR>
government! <BR>
Has exciting links to "New Zealand, a Celtic Country" etc. <BR>
<A HREF="http://www.zealand.org.nz/history.htm">http://www.zealand.org.nz/history.htm</A><BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
/\/.\/\/. ADDS TO THE DISCUSSION OF THOMAS GOODE JONES CAMP<BR>
SCV AND THE MONTGOMERY CITY SEAL: <BR>
<BR>
The following webpage is a most interesting window on Alabama history, the<BR>
true legacy of Gov. Thomas Goode Jones, and the present day. <BR>
<BR>
<A HREF="http://www.bu.edu/historic/abstracts/Abstract-Aucoin.htm">http://www.bu.edu/historic/abstracts/Abstract-Aucoin.htm</A><BR>
<BR>
Here is an instance of a major New England university having a conference<BR>
on Gov. Jones and the post-War period through 1914. It seems clear that<BR>
Gov. Jones was a down-to-earth reformer who took the needs of both blacks<BR>
and whites quite seriously after the War and into the early part of the<BR>
20th century. His approach dissapointed both "Radical Republicans" and<BR>
"Yellow Dog Democrats" of the day, but he certainly would not have approved<BR>
the concept of "civil rights" which prevails at this time and drives<BR>
propaganda offensives such as the one before us.<BR>
    The Governor's son, Judge Walter B. Jones, was my grandfather's second<BR>
cousin. He compiled a collection of "Confederate War Poems" which is still<BR>
sold in our circles. He fought the NAACP from the bench during the "civil<BR>
rights" era itself and in effect decreed that no matter what was happening<BR>
in the streets of Montgomery or any other city there would be no "civil<BR>
rights" revolution in his courtroom -- meaning of course radical black<BR>
militant terror tactics, the real-world definition of "civil rights" as we<BR>
have come to know it in the age of Black Panthers, Jesse Jackson and<BR>
"Affirmative Action". Judge Jones's heroic story is partly told in the<BR>
liberally-slanted book FIFTY-EIGHT LONELY MEN.<BR>
<BR>
  Judge Jones has been widely regarded as the true heir to the T.G. Jones<BR>
tradition of Americanism. Among his other accomplishments he wrote a<BR>
regular column in the Montgy. Advertiser. Below is a sample from 40 years<BR>
ago which shows from yet another angle what the "civil rights" revolution<BR>
which the war on the Montgy. city seal is really all about. I would like to<BR>
challenge anyone in favor of redefining the city of Montgomery in "civil<BR>
rights" terms to demonstrate that the Judge, the Governor or any other of<BR>
their illustrious line would likely have agreed with it (including TGJ's<BR>
father, Samuel Goode Jones, a pioneer railroad builder of the South). . . .<BR>
. . <BR>
<BR>
* * * * * * * * * * * * * <BR>
<BR>
"Off the Bench"<BR>
<BR>
(column by Judge Jones ca. 1960)<BR>
<BR>
    The killing in a Montgomery cemetery near Troy on May 23, last, of a<BR>
43-year-old man who walked into an Ozark bank and murdered in cold blood<BR>
two bank officials and who later on murdered a policeman, brought death to<BR>
a man who richly deserved it. <BR>
    As we read in the newspaper accounts of his attempt to rob the bank and of<BR>
his three murders, we are reminded that at the Common Law, and Alabama is<BR>
largely a Common Law state, there was a thing called "hue and cry." This<BR>
was a loud outcry with which robbers and murderers were anciently pursued,<BR>
and which all who heard it were bound to take up and join in the pursuit<BR>
until the criminal was taken. If the murderer cannot otherwise be taken, he<BR>
may be killed. And so this pursuit of the Ozark murderer and bank robber<BR>
was something like the old "hue and cry" of the Common Law. The officers of<BR>
the law, and those who aided them, and who risked their lives to capture<BR>
the murderer deserve the commendation and praise of all law-abiding citizens.<BR>
    There is another thought which comes to me in this connection and it is<BR>
that the killing of this murderer will save Alabama many, many thousands of<BR>
dollars in prosecuting him had he lived and will save the people of the<BR>
state all the hysterics and sobbing which go with  the trial of a murderer<BR>
under our present system of Alabama law.<BR>
    If the Ozark murderer had lived and been put on trial for his crimes, it<BR>
would have been several years, even if then, before he could have been<BR>
executed.<BR>
    Every technicality known to the law -- and there are thousands of them --<BR>
would have been invoked in favor of the murderer. First of all, he would<BR>
have to be indicted by a grand jury and this might take two or three<BR>
months. Then if he were indicted and arraigned for his crimes, the grand<BR>
jury which indicted him would be under attack and the indictment itself<BR>
would have been carefully scanned to be certain that every "t" was crossed<BR>
and every "i" was dotted.<BR>
    If these hurdles were overcome, then there would be the selection of a<BR>
trial jury and this would be a long, drawn-out affair. The state would pay<BR>
lawyers to defend the murderer and it would get all the witnesses for him.<BR>
Then, at the trial, the defendant would not have to take the stand. If he<BR>
did not, the lawyers for the state could not comment on the fact that the<BR>
defendant was afraid to take the stand. The chances are, the defendant<BR>
would avail himself of the worst abused plea in the criminal law -- insanity.<BR>
    Days would be spent tracing the life of the murderer from his earliest<BR>
days and all sorts of evidence would be introduced to prove that he was of<BR>
unsound mind. If the case got to the jury, then every one of the jurors,<BR>
all 12, would have to agree on a verdict of guilty.<BR>
    If the jury found the defendant guilty and fixed his punishment of death,<BR>
then there would be all kinds of motions for a new trial, and claims would<BR>
be made of newly discovered evidence and the trrial judge would be charged<BR>
with scores of mistakes of law in the conduct of the trial. If the motion<BR>
for a new trial were denied then there would be one appeal after another<BR>
and by this time maybe 18 months would have dragged by.<BR>
    As a matter of fact, even though the defendant did not take the stand in<BR>
his behalf, even though all he made was a formal plea of not guilty, the<BR>
law would take an appeal for him, this under an Alabama statute passed in<BR>
1943 which provides that in any case where the death penalty sentence is<BR>
imposed, it shall be the duty of the trial judge immediately after the<BR>
imposition of sentence to enter in the record an order, with or without the<BR>
election of the defendant, that the defendant appeals from the judgment of<BR>
conviction. Thereupon, the sentence shall be automatically suspended; and<BR>
then if the defendant is without means the state will pay all the costs of<BR>
his appeal and the lawyers appointed to prosecute his appeal will be paid<BR>
by the State of Alabama the sum not in excess of $250.<BR>
    If the State Supreme Court upholds the conviction, then will come a motion<BR>
for rehearing and additional time will be killed. If the court finally<BR>
denies the rehearing, then the murderer will go into the federal courts and<BR>
set up all sorts of claims that in the state court he was denied the equal<BR>
protection of the laws and due process of law. There is no telling how many<BR>
appeals would be made to the federal courts. The Rosenberg traitors had 17<BR>
appeals and Carol Chessman, the California murderer, had 16 appeals. All<BR>
the while the months dragged slowly by. Finally, if all court proceedings<BR>
are completed and the matter finally gets into the governor's hands there<BR>
are all sorts of appeals for clemency, and maybe one reprieve after another<BR>
will be given the condemned; and, finally, maybe, after three or four<BR>
years, the murderer will be executed.<BR>
    In all of these legal proceedings practically every question will be<BR>
discussed except the guilt of the defendant. The state would spend<BR>
thousands of dollars helping the defendant escape justice. It would do<BR>
nothing on earth for the murderer's victims. There would be no<BR>
appropriations to help families bury their dead and there would be no state<BR>
funds given to take the place of the dead breadwinners. All the state's<BR>
money would go to defend the murderer, one who killed in cold blood, one<BR>
who deliberately planned all his actions and who had never really denied<BR>
his crime. Alabama criminal laws all favor the defendant. A criminal gets<BR>
all the breaks and no wonder crime continues to increase.<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
            *****************<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
From:   mca6-@bellsouth.net   <BR>
<BR>
<BR>
General Lee surrendered and then General Joseph Johnson after which General<BR>
Waite signed papers to cease hostilities.<BR>
<BR>
If I am not mistaken, General Lee was the superintendent at West Point when<BR>
Cadet U.S. Grant attended but both saw action in the Mexican war along with<BR>
President Jefferson Davis.<BR>
<BR>
Jerry Wingate<BR>
SCV Camp 1629 Chattahochee Guards<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
            ****************<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
Snowball-toting Rebels raid camp<BR>
<A HREF="http://www.telegram.com/news/valley/scivilwarb.html">http://www.telegram.com/news/valley/scivilwarb.html</A><BR>
<BR>
<BR>
Main Street Gettysburg<BR>
<A HREF="http://www.mainstreetgettysburg.org/msgsales.htm?50,26">http://www.mainstreetgettysburg.org/msgsales.htm?50,26</A><BR>
<BR>
<BR>
</FONT>



</HTML>
--part1_45.17a66e3a.2a1a2033_boundary--
	
 Previous Message All Messages Next Message 
  Check It Out!

  Topica Channels
 Best of Topica
 Art & Design
 Books, Movies & TV
 Developers
 Food & Drink
 Health & Fitness
 Internet
 Music
 News & Information
 Personal Finance
 Personal Technology
 Small Business
 Software
 Sports
 Travel & Leisure
 Women & Family

  Start Your Own List!
Email lists are great for debating issues or publishing your views.
Start a List Today!

© 2001 Topica Inc. TFMB
Concerned about privacy? Topica is TrustE certified.
See our Privacy Policy.