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Take Our Word For It Issue 190  Melanie Crowley
 Sep 11, 2003 23:15 PDT 

Take Our Word For It Issue 190
http://www.takeourword.com

For Mac users who have trouble with our regular homepage:
http://www.takeourword.com/indexmac.html

**Greetings**

The holidays are over for a little while, and we hope to bring TOWFI to
you regularly for the next few months.

**Google AdSense**

The Google ads on the homepage have been interesting. Not all of them
have been etymologically related, but a few have. We like the computer
pointing device from "Origins". Not exactly *word* origins, but
intersting nevertheless.

**This Week's Issue**

NOTE: The links in this newsletter are good for September 11-September
23.

In Spotlight, we present "Life in the 1500s Revisited", where we discuss
another one of those cutesy e-mail messages dealing with supposed
etymologies
http://www.takeourword.com/current/page1.html

In Words to the Wise, we bring you the following words/phrases:

fraught
http://www.takeourword.com/current/page2.html#fraught

jimmy (verb)
http://www.takeourword.com/current/page2.html#jimmy

you have your work cut out for you
http://www.takeourword.com/current/page2.html#workcut

boss
http://www.takeourword.com/current/page2.html#boss

In Curmudgeons' Corner Guestmudgeon Dick Timberlake will zeroscape YOU
if you don't pronounce "xeriscape" correctly!
http://www.takeourword.com/current/page3.html

In Sez You... we hear more about English place-names, asafoetida, the
Greek "b", Moors in Maghreb, pits and pips, simpleportal.com, Bob Barker
in Greek, Washington place-names, Labour Day in Canada, and curmudgeons.
http://www.takeourword.com/current/page4.html

In Laughing Stock we bring you a new linguistic law.
http://www.takeourword.com/current/page5.html

**Newsletter-Only Etymology**

At times, getting TOWFI published on time has been "touch and go". What
on earth does that come from? Well, one of our favorite phraseologists,
Christine Ammer, thinks it refers to a ship's keel rubbing or touching
the seabottom without the ship being grounded, so that the ship could
continue on. She also suggests it may refer to other vehicles, such as
two carriages colliding or rubbing against one another lightly but then
moving on. It dates from the early 19th century.

**Laughing Stock**

Please send us funny clippings or photos (text is fine, too) for use in
Laughing Stock and if we use yours, you'll get an Amazon.com gift
certificate for $10! Ray Adams won this week's gift certificate.
Winners, continue to be patient as we get your prizes out to you.

**Fundraiser**

There are still two copies of the word game Derivation left. They will
go to the next two donors who give $75 or more. Thanks to those who
have donated, from $2 to $250. Everything helps!

**Curmudgeons' Corner**

Don't stop being curmudgeonly! Send in your complaints!

**Next Issue**

We'll bring you a NOE next week, and a new issue of TOWFI on September
23.


Until next time,
Take Our Word For It!
Melanie and Mike

http://www.takeourword.com
http://www.takeourword.com/indexmac.html
	
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