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Antiques & Collecting Newsletter 9/01/2004  Ron McCoy
 Aug 31, 2004 20:53 PDT 

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Antiques & Collecting Newsletter
Volume 9, Number 4
September 1, 2004
Ron McCoy, editor [ro-@collectingbuzz.com]
http://collectingbuzz.com

We are pleased to continue to send you this free monthly newsletter
covering the latest antique/collectible news, trends, web sites,
articles, tidbits, as well as information about the best happenings for
collectors in the antiques & collecting community.

==> NOTE: Our email distribution service (Topica) often inserts
advertising in this newsletter. Since their service to us is free, this
is their way of generating some revenue. These ads are not necessarily
endorsed nor recommended by us and we have no control over what ads are
inserted.

Be sure to let us know if your email address changes. Just send us an
email [ro-@collectingbuzz.com], listing your OLD address and NEW
address. We'll make the correction and you won't miss any issues of the
newsletter.


      (¯`·.¸¸.-> IN THIS ISSUE

LINCOLN HIGHWAY ROADSIDE MUSEUM
CLASSIC PRINT ADS
AN ADVENTURE IN MOVIEMAKING
TAKE IT FOR A SPIN
MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN
CASH MEMORABILIA TO BE AUCTIONED
THE MATCHSTICK MAN
TALL BUILDINGS
EYE MINIATURES
TROY AUCTION ON EBAY


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LINCOLN HIGHWAY ROADSIDE MUSEUM
http://www.lhhc.org/content/subpag/muse.htm

In 1913, when road conditions were often unsuitable for automobiles, a
call was made for the nation's first transcontinental highway. So the
Lincoln Highway was built, connecting New York City with San Francisco.
Motorists will soon be able to learn more about the historic road as
they drive a stretch running through Pennsylvania. From historical
markers to kitschy landmarks like a renovated coffeepot-shaped building
near Bedford, the highway will be commemorated with 250 exhibits along a
200-mile stretch of U.S. Route 30 between Pittsburgh and Gettysburg.
Also featured are murals that detail the road's history. The roadside
museum is run by Lincoln Highway Heritage Corridor, a Ligonier-based
nonprofit group dedicated to preserving Pennsylvania's leg of the
highway.


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CLASSIC PRINT ADS
http://www.adflip.com

Print advertising as we know it has largely evolved since the 40’s. To
see some of this evolution, visit Adflip, proclaimed as the world’s
largest archive of classic print ads. It features ads from 1940-2001. A
extra feature of the site is that you can send any one of the ads as an
e-card to a friend.


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AN ADVENTURE IN MOVIEMAKING
http://www.msichicago.org

Gregory Peck's original script with his notations from the movie "To
Kill a Mockingbird" are among the Hollywood relics on display at
Chicago's $2.6 million exhibit "Action! An Adventure in Moviemaking" at
the Museum of Science and Industry. Visitors can see the scruffed bomber
jacket worn by Harrison Ford in the "Raiders of the Lost Ark" trilogy,
the harpoon gun used to spear the shark in "Jaws" and the costume worn
by Tobey Maguire in the movie "Spider-Man." A photo overview of the
exhibit can be seen online. The exhibit runs through Jan. 9 and later
will travel to other museums in the United States and Europe.


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TAKE IT FOR A SPIN
http://www.wham-o.com/content/hulahoop.html

The children of America fell in love with the Hula Hoop, the "the
granddaddy of American fads." Demand for these large plastic rings was
so great that toy manufacturers couldn't keep up. In 1958 Wham-O
Manufacturing Company in San Gabriel, California, hearing about the fun
kids were having in Australia using bamboo hoops in exercise classes,
created the prototype hula hoop (made not of plastic but of ash wood).
The company, and later about 40 imitators, began manufacturing, for
about 50 cents each, and selling, for $1.98 each, polyethylene plastic
rings called Hula Hoops. Within six months children and adults were
spinning 30 million hoops. The Hula Hoop has become a classic toy--no
longer a fad, but one that still sells predictably and steadily year
after year. Toy collectors who can find any of the 50s classic Hula
Hoops with original tags can expect to pay $20+.


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MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN
http://www.nmai.si.edu

The newest Smithsonian museum is gathering ancient ceramics, intricate
beadwork and modern art to illustrate the past and present of native
peoples spread across the Western Hemisphere for some 20,000 years. When
the National Museum of the American Indian opens Sept. 21, it will seek
to give the appropriate weight to injustices suffered at the hands of
white settlers—but will not make that the focus of a history that sweeps
over millennia.


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CASH MEMORABILIA TO BE AUCTIONED
http://tinyurl.com/5tcuo

One piece at a time, Johnny Cash's guitars, banjos, handwritten lyrics,
photographs, vintage black leather clothing, Grammy Awards and other
belongings will be auctioned Sept. 14 and 15 by Sotheby's New York. More
than 650 pieces from the estate of the country music icon and his wife,
June Carter Cash, will be offered. Estimated value of the collection is
about $1.5 million. You can browse the auction catalog online.


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THE MATCHSTICK MAN
http://tinyurl.com/5p9hc

What do you do with your matchsticks after you burn them? Do you toss
them away? For an answer to this pressing problem, we need only to turn
to a man named Jack Hall. He found the perfect solution to the used
matchstick dilemma. He used the matches to jump off into the world of
matchstick music. This site explains his hobby and offers some pictures
of his projects.


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TALL BUILDINGS
http://moma.org/exhibitions/2004/tallbuildings/index_f.html

Many of the world's famous skyscrapers were built decades ago, most of
them incredibly tall, straight columns that mingle with the clouds
thousands of feet in the air. A new exhibit at the MoMA sets its sites
on recent skyscraper designs, focusing on 25 groundbreaking buildings
designed over the past decade. Featuring scale models, sketches, and
designs, the exhibit looks at the next generation of tall buildings.
Also included in the exhibit are three of the proposals for the World
Trade Center site in New York City.


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EYE MINIATURES
by Elyse Zorn Karlin [ekar-@usa.net]

In the late 1700s, when George IV of England was still the Prince of
Wales, he fell in love with the beautiful widow Maria Fitzherbert.
Unfortunately for him, she was not deemed a suitable match for the heir
to the throne so they were forced to marry clandestinely. In order to
have a secret reminder of his love with him at all times, the lovestruck
prince had a brooch with a miniature portrait of Maria’s eye made which
he wore inside his coat. He had another with a portrait of his own eye
made for his illicit wife. In doing so George set off a fashion craze.

George’s father (the man blamed for losing England’s colony—America)
unaware of the Fitzherbert union, eventually married him off to a
princess George detested. Within a few years he left his arranged
marriage and returned to Maria. Although they did not end their days
together, it is said he wore the brooch until the end of his life.

“Eye” brooches are very collectible and fakes are being created today.
Memorial brooches dating to the 19th century, which once held a lock of
a loved one’s hair, can be found on the market with new “eye paintings”
enclosed within them.

Editor's note: Elyse Zorn Karlin is the publisher of Adornment, The
Newsletter of Jewelry & Related Arts, a quarterly publication on
jewelry. Email her for information.


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TROY AUCTION ON EBAY
http://tinyurl.com/5dfhz

An auction of costumes and props from the summer blockbuster "Troy"
starring Brad Pitt is currently on eBay through Sept. 4. Benefiting
Best Friends Animal Society, the auction includes unique pottery,
statuary, costumes and Greek and Trojan armor from the film.


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HELP US GROW!

This newsletter is a private endeavor and not part of some big
publishing empire. It's just me here, working alone, with no budget or
staff to handle promotion. The newsletter depends on word of mouth to
grow. In each issue, I try to offer useful, interesting and amusing
articles to help you enjoy your hobby of collecting. Can you take just a
minute to help me out in return?

If you think the Antiques & Collecting Newsletter is a worthwhile read,
forward the entire newsletter to someone and suggest they subscribe by
emailing me or visiting: http://collectingbuzz.com

_________________________________

Antiques & Collecting Newsletter
U.S. Library of Congress ISSN #1521-1827
Copyright 1996-2004, Ron McCoy - All rights reserved
Archives on the Web at: http://www.topica.com/lists/antique-collect/read
Subscribe: http://collectingbuzz.com

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