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RE: wind turbine noise and plant growth...  Jim Mantey (mon' tye)
 Nov 29, 2004 11:38 PST 

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...maybe we need more noise and less tobacco, kidding!

Where was your cherry farm? I have a good buddy in Ellsworth that is a
cherry producer.

At 09:14 AM 11/15/2004, you wrote:
 Daniel,

I haven't seen information about noise, but here
is another article of concern about local temperature
changes. I grew up on a cherry farm near Lake
Michigan and am familiar with the special climate
microcosm that allows fruit to be raised in that
region. If blossoms open too early as could be
encouraged by unseasonably warm temperatures, and a cold
snap occurs, the crop can be severely damaged. The
temperature balance for a fruit crop is quite delicate.
From the article cited below, temperature changes, at least
to the local region, should be of concern when locating wind
turbines in the fruit-growing belt along Lake Michigan.

In case you cannot open the article from the address below
without registering, perhaps you can go to globeandmail.com
and look for the article. It was published in this Toronto
paper on Tuesday, November 9, 2004 and was called "Wind Power not
all Pleasant Breezes" by Stepen Strauss. This article talks
about a shift in local, and possibly worldwide, temperatures
from construction of wind turbines.

The Globe article reports on a study by a group of Canadian and
U.S. Scientists that reported "that computer simulations show
that a large-scale use of wind farms to generatie electrical
power could create a significant temperature change over Earth's
land masses." The lead author of the report which appeared in the
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences is David Keith, a
professor of energy and the environment at the University of
Calgary. It is interesting to note that the Globe article
cites that "these findings mirror an actual but previously
ignored temperature rise that U.S. government meteorologist
Neil Kelly observed at an actual wind farm in California in 1990.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20041109.wwind1109/BNStor
y/specialScienceandHealth/


Evelyn Bergaila

-----Original Message-----
From: Daniel Alberts [mailto:galactic-@nethere.com]
Sent: Thursday, November 11, 2004 10:01 PM
To: Michigan Wind Working Group
Subject: [Delphi] wind turbine noise and plant growth...


People,

I'm reading a book titled, "Noise Pollution" by Clifford Bragdon. The book
mentions a study where tobacco plants exposed to continuous noise levels of
100 dB exhibit a 40% decrease in growth compared to similar plants not
exposed to the noise.

Since turbine noise can range from 102-107 dB at the source, this might be
relevant to our audience.

Unfortunately, The book says the source of this information is from 1969.
("Effect of Random Noise on Plant Growth" Journal of Acoustical Society of
America, 46:8) and I can't seem to find anything more recent.

Can anyone follow up with this and find me some more recent information?

Thanks.

-Daniel



Daniel Alberts
Project Leader
Lawrence Tech's Wind Delphi Project
www.ltu.edu/engineering/mechanical/delphi_wind.asp
dja1-@nethere.com
home: (586) 939-4325

James Mantey
Huron MSU Extension
Field Crops Agent
Forage AoE Co-Chair
(989) 269-9949 office
(989) 553-3355 cell
99 Soper Road
Suite B
Bad Axe, MI 48413
man-@msu.edu
A day without sunshine is like, ...well, night!

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<html>
<body>
<br>
...maybe we need more noise and less tobacco,  kidding!<br><br>
Where was your cherry farm?  I have a good buddy in Ellsworth that
is a cherry producer.<br><br>
At 09:14 AM 11/15/2004, you wrote:<br>
<blockquote type=cite class=cite cite>Daniel,<br><br>
I haven't seen information about noise, but here<br>
is another article of concern about local temperature<br>
changes. I grew up on a cherry farm near Lake<br>
Michigan and am familiar with the special climate<br>
microcosm that allows fruit to be raised in that<br>
region. If blossoms open too early as could be<br>
encouraged by unseasonably warm temperatures, and a cold<br>
snap occurs, the crop can be severely damaged. The<br>
temperature balance for a fruit crop is quite delicate.<br>
From the article cited below, temperature changes, at least<br>
to the local region, should be of concern when locating wind<br>
turbines in the fruit-growing belt along Lake Michigan.<br><br>
In case you cannot open the article from the address below<br>
without registering, perhaps you can go to globeandmail.com<br>
and look for the article. It was published in this Toronto<br>
paper on Tuesday, November 9, 2004 and was called "Wind Power
not<br>
all Pleasant Breezes" by Stepen Strauss. This article talks<br>
about a shift in local, and possibly worldwide, temperatures<br>
from construction of wind turbines.<br><br>
The Globe article reports on a study by a group of Canadian and<br>
U.S. Scientists that reported "that computer simulations show<br>
that a large-scale use of wind farms to generatie electrical<br>
power could create a significant temperature change over Earth's<br>
land masses." The lead author of the report which appeared in
the<br>
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences is David Keith, a<br>
professor of energy and the environment at the University of<br>
Calgary. It is interesting to note that the Globe article<br>
cites that "these findings mirror an actual but previously<br>
ignored temperature rise that U.S. government meteorologist<br>
Neil Kelly observed at an actual wind farm in California in
1990.<br><br>
<a href="http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20041109.wwind1109/BNStor" eudora="autourl">http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20041109.wwind1109/BNStor</a><br>
y/specialScienceandHealth/<br><br>
<br>
Evelyn Bergaila<br><br>
-----Original Message-----<br>
From: Daniel Alberts
[<a href="mailto:galactic-@nethere.com" eudora="autourl">mailto:galactic-@nethere.com</a>]<br>
Sent: Thursday, November 11, 2004 10:01 PM<br>
To: Michigan Wind Working Group<br>
Subject: [Delphi] wind turbine noise and plant growth...<br><br>
<br>
People,<br><br>
I'm reading a book titled, "Noise Pollution" by Clifford
Bragdon. The book<br>
mentions a study where tobacco plants exposed to continuous noise levels
of<br>
100 dB exhibit a 40% decrease in growth compared to similar plants
not<br>
exposed to the noise.<br><br>
Since turbine noise can range from 102-107 dB at the source, this might
be<br>
relevant to our audience.<br><br>
Unfortunately, The book says the source of this information is from
1969.<br>
("Effect of Random Noise on Plant Growth" Journal of Acoustical
Society of<br>
America, 46:8) and I can't seem to find anything more recent.<br><br>
Can anyone follow up with this and find me some more recent
information?<br><br>
Thanks.<br><br>
-Daniel<br><br>
<br><br>
Daniel Alberts<br>
Project Leader<br>
Lawrence Tech's Wind Delphi Project<br>
<a href="http://www.ltu.edu/engineering/mechanical/delphi_wind.asp" eudora="autourl">www.ltu.edu/engineering/mechanical/delphi_wind.asp</a><br>
dja1-@nethere.com<br>
home: (586) 939-4325<br><br>
<br>

<body>
<font face="Rage Italic" size=6><b>James Mantey<br>
</b></font><font face="Pristina" size=4>Huron MSU Extension<br>
Field Crops Agent<br>
Forage AoE Co-Chair<br>
<b><i>(989) 269-9949 office<br>
(989) 553-3355 cell<br>
</i></b></font><font face="Mistral" size=4>99 Soper Road<br>
Suite B<br>
Bad Axe, MI 48413</font> <br>
man-@msu.edu<br>
<font face="STOMP_Blue Highway Condensed"><i>A day without sunshine is
like,  ...well, night!<br>
</font></i></body>
</html>

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