Welcome Guest!
 LTUDelphi
 Previous Message All Messages Next Message 
Re: Wildlife Delphi: Round 2 1/2...  white-@earthlink.net
 May 21, 2005 20:52 PDT 

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------=_NextPart_000_0046_01C55E5F.FE7016F0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Wildlife Delphi: Round 2 1/2...I'm trying to get more information. Certainly at night, bats leave their roosts to hunt and feed. Shouldn't the protected area extend a distance from their "nests" to the furthest reach of this hunting / flight area?   How about protecting migratory paths as well?

I learned more from this British Bat Conservation Site
http://www.batcon.org/wind/findings.html

Search efficiency and carcass removal by scavengers is highly variable among sites, varies with vegetative cover and terrain, and must be accounted for when estimating total number of bats killed.

Current evidence suggests that bat mortality appears to be highest in or near forests, especially along ridge tops, moderate in open areas close to forest in the Midwest, and lowest in open grassland or farmland away from forests.

Data from studies in open habitats should not be extrapolated to forest environments.

Currently, no detailed studies of bat fatality or interactions with turbines have been conducted in Texas, Oklahoma, Arizona, or New Mexico, where large concentrations of bats occur, including migratory free-tailed bats.

In forested areas, risk may extend through most of the summer in addition to periods of spring or fall migration.

Hoary, red, and silver-haired bats are killed most frequently, but there are regional differences in species composition of fatalities.

Current evidence indicates that bats rarely strike either meteorological towers or non-operating wind turbines.

Peaks in bird and bat kills appear to be largely non-overlapping, with bats preceding birds in fall migration.

No endangered species of bat has yet been found and reported killed at a wind farm in the continental United States. However, observations to date are too few to speculate on risk levels to several endangered species that occupy habitats in the vicinity of proposed and existing wind farms (e.g., the Indiana bat during migration).

Red bats are one of the species most frequently killed by turbines in the U.S. and they appear already to have been reduced sharply from historical numbers. There is serious concern that proliferation of wind energy development could push such bats toward endangered status unless methods to prevent or minimize mortality are found.

Unlike many species of birds, bats are long-lived, have low reproductive rates, and appear to be especially vulnerable to wind turbines. Unless solutions are soon discovered to prevent or minimize this new threat, the cumulative impact on populations of bats could become extremely serious.










----- Original Message -----
From: Daniel Alberts
To: Michigan Wind Working Group ; hsgo-@mtu.edu ; alin-@nmu.edu ; e-@naturesecho.com ; elimy-@hotmail.com ; obcb-@aol.com ; sdeg-@nmu.edu ; spar-@voyager.net ; whyl-@aol.com ; wisco-@yahoo.com ; thes-@hotmail.com ; Jessica_-@fws.gov
Cc: mtut-@batcon.org ; Koc-@michigan.gov ; Craig_Cz-@fws.gov ; Mike_De-@fws.gov ; Burr_F-@fws.gov ; Jack_Din-@fws.gov
Sent: Thursday, May 19, 2005 1:51 PM
Subject: [Delphi] Wildlife Delphi: Round 2 1/2...


Everyone,

Thank you for participating in LTU's Delphi Inquiry into Wind Turbines' Impact on Wildlife. The second survey has yielded some very interesting results. The participants demonstrated unanimous (10 out of 10) or significant (8 out of 10) agreement on 15 out of 24 questions. Three of the questions on which you demonstrated agreement are:


    a.. Should wind turbines be prohibited within a certain distance (onshore) of Michiganšs coastline? (Yes: 8, No: 2)



    a.. Should the Michigan Siting Guidelines recommend a minimum distance from caves where bats are known to hibernate?(Yes: 10, No: 0)



    a.. Should the Michigan Siting Guidelines recommend a minimum distance from bird sanctuaries? (Yes: 10, No: 0)


Unfortunately, there was no agreement on the specific distance that turbines should be banned from the shoreline, and we didn't ask what distance turbines should be banned from bird sanctuaries or bat hibernacula turbines.

We don't have time to complete a third iteration. (We must deliver the final report on May 26th.) But I would like to ask two follow-up questions:


    1.. At this time, do you have enough information to determine what should be the minimum distance between a wind turbine and either a bird sanctuary or a bat hibernaculum?
    2.. Do you believe a third Delphi survey on this subject could demonstrate significant agreement (8 out of 10) on what those distances should be?


Please respond by Monday, May 23rd.

Thank you



Daniel Alberts
Lawrence Tech's Wind Energy Delphi
www.ltu.edu/engineering/mechanical/delphi_wind.asp
dja1-@nethere.com


------=_NextPart_000_0046_01C55E5F.FE7016F0
Content-Type: text/html;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD><TITLE>Wildlife Delphi: Round 2 1/2...</TITLE>
<META http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<META content="MSHTML 6.00.2900.2627" name=GENERATOR>
<STYLE></STYLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY bgColor=#ffffec>
<DIV><FONT face="Comic Sans MS">I'm trying to get more information. 
Certainly at night, bats leave their roosts to hunt and feed.  Shouldn't
the protected area extend a distance from their "nests" to the furthest reach of
this hunting / flight area?   How about protecting migratory paths as
well?  </FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face="Comic Sans MS"></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face="Comic Sans MS">I learned more from this British Bat
Conservation Site</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face="Comic Sans MS"><A
href="http://www.batcon.org/wind/findings.html">http://www.batcon.org/wind/findings.html</A></FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face="Comic Sans MS"></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face="Comic Sans MS">Search efficiency and carcass removal by
scavengers is highly variable among sites, varies with vegetative cover and
terrain, and must be accounted for when estimating total number of bats
killed.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face="Comic Sans MS"> Current evidence suggests that bat
mortality appears to be highest in or near forests, especially along ridge tops,
moderate in open areas close to forest in the Midwest, and lowest in open
grassland or farmland away from forests.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face="Comic Sans MS">Data from studies in open habitats should not be
extrapolated to forest environments.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face="Comic Sans MS">Currently, no detailed studies of bat fatality
or interactions with turbines have been conducted in Texas, Oklahoma, Arizona,
or New Mexico, where large concentrations of bats occur, including migratory
free-tailed bats.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face="Comic Sans MS">In forested areas, risk may extend through most
of the summer in addition to periods of spring or fall migration.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face="Comic Sans MS">Hoary, red, and silver-haired bats are killed
most frequently, but there are regional differences in species composition of
fatalities.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face="Comic Sans MS">Current evidence indicates that bats rarely
strike either meteorological towers or non-operating wind turbines.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face="Comic Sans MS"></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face="Comic Sans MS"> Peaks in bird and bat kills appear to be
largely non-overlapping, with bats preceding birds in fall
migration.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face="Comic Sans MS"></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face="Comic Sans MS"> No endangered species of bat has yet been
found and reported killed at a wind farm in the continental United States.
However, observations to date are too few to speculate on risk levels to several
endangered species that occupy habitats in the vicinity of proposed and existing
wind farms (e.g., the Indiana bat during migration).</FONT></DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face="Comic Sans MS"> Red bats are one of the species most
frequently killed by turbines in the U.S. and they appear already to have been
reduced sharply from historical numbers. There is serious concern that
proliferation of wind energy development could push such bats toward endangered
status unless methods to prevent or minimize mortality are found.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face="Comic Sans MS"></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face="Comic Sans MS"> Unlike many species of birds, bats are
long-lived, have low reproductive rates, and appear to be especially vulnerable
to wind turbines. Unless solutions are soon discovered to prevent or minimize
this new threat, the cumulative impact on populations of bats could become
extremely serious.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face="Comic Sans MS"></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face="Comic Sans MS"></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face="Comic Sans MS"></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face="Comic Sans MS"></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face="Comic Sans MS"></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face="Comic Sans MS"></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face="Comic Sans MS"></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face="Comic Sans MS"></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face="Comic Sans MS"></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face="Comic Sans MS"></FONT> </DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE dir=ltr
style="PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
<DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial">----- Original Message ----- </DIV>
<DIV
style="BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; FONT: 10pt arial; font-color: black"><B>From:</B>
<A title=galac-@nethere.com
href="mailto:galactic-@nethere.com">Daniel Alberts</A> </DIV>
<DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>To:</B> <A title-@topica.com
href="mailto:mw-@topica.com">Michigan Wind Working Group</A> ; <A
title=h-@mtu.edu href="mailto:hsgo-@mtu.edu">hsgo-@mtu.edu</A> ;
<A title=a-@nmu.edu href="mailto:alin-@nmu.edu">alin-@nmu.edu</A>
; <A titl-@naturesecho.com
href="mailto:e-@naturesecho.com">e-@naturesecho.com</A> ; <A
title=el-@hotmail.com
href="mailto:elimy-@hotmail.com">elimy-@hotmail.com</A> ; <A
title=o-@aol.com href="mailto:obcb-@aol.com">obcb-@aol.com</A> ; <A
title=s-@nmu.edu href="mailto:sdeg-@nmu.edu">sdeg-@nmu.edu</A> ;
<A title=s-@voyager.net
href="mailto:spar-@voyager.net">spar-@voyager.net</A> ; <A
title=w-@aol.com href="mailto:whyl-@aol.com">whyl-@aol.com</A> ;
<A title=wi-@yahoo.com
href="mailto:wisco-@yahoo.com">wisco-@yahoo.com</A> ; <A
title=t-@hotmail.com
href="mailto:thes-@hotmail.com">thes-@hotmail.com</A> ; <A
title=Jessi-@fws.gov
href="mailto:Jessica_-@fws.gov">Jessica_-@fws.gov</A> </DIV>
<DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Cc:</B> <A title=m-@batcon.org
href="mailto:mtut-@batcon.org">mtut-@batcon.org</A> ; <A
title=-@michigan.gov
href="mailto:Koc-@michigan.gov">Koc-@michigan.gov</A> ; <A
title=Craig-@fws.gov
href="mailto:Craig_Cz-@fws.gov">Craig_Cz-@fws.gov</A> ; <A
title=Mike-@fws.gov
href="mailto:Mike_De-@fws.gov">Mike_De-@fws.gov</A> ; <A
title=Bur-@fws.gov
href="mailto:Burr_F-@fws.gov">Burr_F-@fws.gov</A> ; <A
title=Jack_-@fws.gov
href="mailto:Jack_Din-@fws.gov">Jack_Din-@fws.gov</A> </DIV>
<DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Sent:</B> Thursday, May 19, 2005 1:51
PM</DIV>
<DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Subject:</B> [Delphi] Wildlife Delphi: Round
2 1/2...</DIV>
<DIV><BR></DIV>Everyone, <BR><BR>Thank you for participating in LTU's Delphi
Inquiry into Wind Turbines' Impact on Wildlife. The second survey has yielded
some very interesting results.  The participants demonstrated unanimous
(10 out of 10) or significant (8 out of 10) agreement on 15 out of 24
questions. Three of the questions on which you demonstrated agreement are:
<BR><BR>
<UL>
    <LI>Should wind turbines be prohibited within a certain distance (onshore)
    of Michiganšs coastline? (Yes: 8, No: 2)<BR></LI></UL><BR>
<UL>
    <LI>Should the Michigan Siting Guidelines recommend a minimum distance from
    caves where bats are known to hibernate?(Yes: 10, No: 0)<BR></LI></UL><BR>
<UL>
    <LI>Should the Michigan Siting Guidelines recommend a minimum distance from
    bird sanctuaries? (Yes: 10, No: 0)<BR></LI></UL><BR>Unfortunately, there was
no agreement on the specific distance that turbines should be banned from the
shoreline, and we didn't ask what distance turbines should be banned from bird
sanctuaries or bat hibernacula turbines. <BR><BR>We don't have time to
complete a third iteration. (We must deliver the final report on May 26th.)
But I would like to ask  two  follow-up questions: <BR><BR>
<OL>
    <LI>At this time, do you have enough information to determine what should be
    the minimum distance between a wind turbine and either a bird sanctuary or a
    bat hibernaculum?
    <LI>Do you believe a third Delphi survey on this subject could demonstrate
    significant agreement (8 out of 10) on what those distances should
    be?<BR></LI></OL><BR>Please respond by Monday, May 23rd.  <BR><BR>Thank
you <BR><BR><BR><BR>Daniel Alberts<BR>Lawrence Tech's Wind Energy Delphi<BR><A
href="http://www.ltu.edu/engineering/mechanical/delphi_wind.asp">www.ltu.edu/engineering/mechanical/delphi_wind.asp</A><BR>dja1-@nethere.com<BR><BR></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>

------=_NextPart_000_0046_01C55E5F.FE7016F0--
	
 Previous Message All Messages Next Message 
  Check It Out!

  Topica Channels
 Best of Topica
 Art & Design
 Books, Movies & TV
 Developers
 Food & Drink
 Health & Fitness
 Internet
 Music
 News & Information
 Personal Finance
 Personal Technology
 Small Business
 Software
 Sports
 Travel & Leisure
 Women & Family

  Start Your Own List!
Email lists are great for debating issues or publishing your views.
Start a List Today!

© 2001 Topica Inc. TFMB
Concerned about privacy? Topica is TrustE certified.
See our Privacy Policy.