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Re: Wildlife Delphi: Round 2 1/2... Copper Falls mine  white-@earthlink.net
 May 21, 2005 22:04 PDT 

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Wildlife Delphi: Round 2 1/2...
Bats fly relatively long distances swiftly. Thus they can be effective transporters of pollen between widely spaced flowers and thereby perform effective cross pollination in the process. Although local visits are more frequent, bats may forage long distances from their daytime roosts. In some instances, bats travel long distances to a specific plant population; one fruit bat species in Africa flies two and a half hours nightly to visit a particular chiropterophilous plant species.

http://www.botgard.ucla.edu/html/MEMBGNewsletter/Volume4number4/Batsandtheirflowers.html



http://www.batcon.org/media/press002.html



For Immediate Release

      Date: December 5, 2001
     


      Contact:

      E-mail:
      Phone:
      Fax:

     Bob Benson
      Public Information Manager
      bben-@batcon.org
      512.327.9721
      512.327.9724

     Rebecca Rooney
      Media Relations
      rroo-@batcon.org
     





Thousands of Bats to be Protected at Copper Falls Mine
Natural resource agencies work with Bat Conservation International to save thousands of bats in the Upper Peninsula
Austin, TX - The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MI DNR), Lake Superior Land (A subsidiary of International Paper,) and Bat Conservation International (BCI) have gated the Copper Falls Mine, home to a hibernating colony of 11,000 bats. The mine is located on Lake Superior Land on the Keweenaw Peninsula, just north of Houghton and Calumet. The mine opening was fitted with a bat compatible gate that keeps people safe from the hazards of abandoned mines while allowing bats free passage.

Over the past 6 years, BCI has protected several colonies of mine-roosting bats, including many in the Great Lakes region, through the North American Bats and Mines project. BCI has focused the current efforts of the North American Bats and Mines project in the Great Lakes region because large populations of bats take refuge in the deep old copper and iron mines of Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota. This project is a growing partnership of landowners, industry, government and non-profit groups who are working together to protect bat habitat while safeguarding humans from possible injuries due to unsafe mine openings.

The gating project at Copper Falls Mine represents a tremendous conservation effort, as the new gate is crucial for the survival of thousands of bats that rely on mines as a safe winter haven. Because bats travel from many other states to hibernate in the Great Lakes Region, the loss of just one mine could have devastating effects on bats that in the summer feed on crop-destroying pests in Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin, or Minnesota.

"These bats are dependent on these abandoned underground mines for their survival," says Faith Watkins, Project Coordinator for BCI, "It makes sense to utilize the mines for habitat that would otherwise be a hazard for humans."

Bats play essential roles in ecosystem balance and are primary predators of insects that cost farmers and foresters billions of dollars annually. Bat populations are an integral part of a biological pest management plan that allows for a decrease in the use of chemical pesticides-helping to reduce associated water pollution, protect biodiversity, and reduce losses for farmers and foresters.

For more information about BCI or BCI's North American Bats and Mines project, please contact Rebecca Rooney, Public Relations, rroo-@batcon.org or Faith Watkins, North American Bats & Mines Project Coordinator, fwat-@batcon.org, or visit us on the web at http://www.batcon.org/mines/index.html.

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<HTML><HEAD><TITLE>Wildlife Delphi: Round 2 1/2...</TITLE>
<META http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
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<DIV><!--StartFragment --> 
<P align=left>Bats fly relatively long distances swiftly. Thus they can be
effective transporters of pollen between widely spaced flowers and thereby
perform effective cross pollination in the process. Although local visits are
more frequent, bats may forage long distances from their daytime roosts. In some
instances, bats travel long distances to a specific plant population; one fruit
bat species in Africa flies two and a half hours nightly to visit a particular
chiropterophilous plant species.</P>
<P align=left><A
href="http://www.botgard.ucla.edu/html/MEMBGNewsletter/Volume4number4/Batsandtheirflowers.html">http://www.botgard.ucla.edu/html/MEMBGNewsletter/Volume4number4/Batsandtheirflowers.html</A></P>
<P align=left><FONT face="Comic Sans MS"></FONT> </P>
<P align=left><FONT face="Comic Sans MS"><A
href="http://www.batcon.org/media/press002.html">http://www.batcon.org/media/press002.html</A></FONT></P>
<P align=left><FONT face="Comic Sans MS"></FONT> </P>
<P align=left><!--StartFragment --> <FONT face=arial><B><I>For Immediate
Release</I></B></FONT></P>
<P>
<TABLE border=0>
<TBODY>
<TR>
    <TD width=70><B>Date:</B></TD>
    <TD width=200>December 5, 2001<BR></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></P>
<P>
<TABLE border=0>
<TBODY>
<TR>
    <TD vAlign=top width=70><FONT face=arial></FONT>
      <P><FONT face=arial><B>Contact:</B></FONT></P>
      <P><FONT face=arial><B>E-mail:</B><BR><B>Phone:</B><BR><B>Fax:
      </B><BR></FONT></P></TD>
    <TD vAlign=top width=200><FONT face=Arial></FONT>
      <P><FONT face=Arial>Bob Benson<BR>Public Information Manager<BR><A
      href="mailto:bben-@batcon.org">bben-@batcon.org</A><BR>512.327.9721<BR>512.327.9724</FONT></P>
      <P></P></TD>
    <TD vAlign=top width=200><FONT face=arial>Rebecca Rooney<BR>Media
      Relations<BR><A
      href="mailto:rroo-@batcon.org">rroo-@batcon.org</A><BR></FONT></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></P>
<P><FONT face=arial><BR><FONT face=Arial></FONT></FONT></P>
<CENTER><FONT face=arial><FONT face=Arial><B><FONT size=4>Thousands of Bats to
be Protected at Copper Falls Mine</FONT></B><BR><I>Natural resource agencies
work with Bat Conservation International to save thousands of bats in the Upper
Peninsula</I></FONT></FONT></CENTER><FONT face=arial><FONT
face=Arial></FONT></FONT>
<P><FONT face=arial><FONT face=Arial><FONT face=Arial><B>Austin, TX</B> – The
Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), Michigan Department of Natural
Resources (MI DNR), Lake Superior Land (A subsidiary of International Paper,)
and Bat Conservation International (BCI) have gated the Copper Falls Mine, home
to a hibernating colony of 11,000 bats. The mine is located on Lake Superior
Land on the Keweenaw Peninsula, just north of Houghton and Calumet. The mine
opening was fitted with a bat compatible gate that keeps people safe from the
hazards of abandoned mines while allowing bats free
passage.</FONT></FONT></FONT></P>
<P><FONT face=arial><FONT face=Arial><FONT face=Arial>Over the past 6 years, BCI
has protected several colonies of mine-roosting bats, including many in the
Great Lakes region, through the North American Bats and Mines project. BCI has
focused the current efforts of the North American Bats and Mines project in the
Great Lakes region because large populations of bats take refuge in the deep old
copper and iron mines of Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota. This project is a
growing partnership of landowners, industry, government and non-profit groups
who are working together to protect bat habitat while safeguarding humans from
possible injuries due to unsafe mine openings. </FONT></FONT></FONT></P>
<P><FONT face=arial><FONT face=Arial><FONT face=Arial>The gating project at
Copper Falls Mine represents a tremendous conservation effort, as the new gate
is crucial for the survival of thousands of bats that rely on mines as a safe
winter haven. Because bats travel from many other states to hibernate in the
Great Lakes Region, the loss of just one mine could have devastating effects on
bats that in the summer feed on crop-destroying pests in Illinois, Iowa,
Wisconsin, or Minnesota. </FONT></FONT></FONT></P>
<P><FONT face=arial><FONT face=Arial><FONT face=Arial>“These bats are dependent
on these abandoned underground mines for their survival,” says Faith Watkins,
Project Coordinator for BCI, “It makes sense to utilize the mines for habitat
that would otherwise be a hazard for humans.” </FONT></FONT></FONT></P>
<P><FONT face=arial><FONT face=Arial><FONT face=Arial>Bats play essential roles
in ecosystem balance and are primary predators of insects that cost farmers and
foresters billions of dollars annually. Bat populations are an integral part of
a biological pest management plan that allows for a decrease in the use of
chemical pesticides—helping to reduce associated water pollution, protect
biodiversity, and reduce losses for farmers and foresters.
</FONT></FONT></FONT></P>
<P><FONT face=arial><FONT face=Arial><FONT face=Arial>For more information about
BCI or BCI's North American Bats and Mines project, please contact Rebecca
Rooney, Public Relations, <A
href="mailto:rroo-@batcon.org">rroo-@batcon.org</A> or Faith Watkins, North
American Bats & Mines Project Coordinator, <A
href="mailto:fwat-@batcon.org">fwat-@batcon.org</A>, or visit us on the
web at <A
href="http://http://www.batcon.org/mines/index.html">http://www.batcon.org/mines/index.html</A>.
</FONT></FONT></FONT></P></DIV></BODY></HTML>

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