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RE: Travis/Eno ( 2)  Tom Boon
 May 31, 2007 13:41 PDT 

Peter van Doorm wrote:

 I think there`s a slight chanche some of the abandonned
Eno/Travis material might creep up on these singles).
Also, the UK release of the album has 2 bonustracks
( `Sailing away` and `Perfect Heaven Space`)as compared
to the European release. Maybe somebody out there got the details ?

I had a look at the CD in the shops but there's just a sticker on the
cover saying there are 2 hidden bonus tracks and that there are details
in the inlay booklet. But as the CDs are sealed I couldn't read the
booklet.

From a Google trawl it looks as though Travis recorded a lot of material
that they are more likely to release than the sessions with Brian. The
more-or-less relevant article excerpts are below.

Tom


From
http://www.news.com.au/heraldsun/story/0,21985,21781514-2902,00.html   
--

The Boy With No Name nearly took another arthouse twist. When thinking
of producers, Healy went to the last name on his wishlist -- Brian Eno,
the experimental genius behind some of U2's finest work.

Travis and Eno worked together for several days.

"We realised it was interesting music, but I'm the songwriter and I've
got to take control. I'd wandered away with 12 Memories. Eno swung me
back into realising I had to write songs with melodies people haven't
heard before."

Eno's methods have been politely described as unusual. Healy laughs at
the memories.

"He'd say, 'Write a descriptive word to describe music'. We'd write 60
cards, he'd pull two out from a bag and say, 'Dark, metallic. Go and
play an instrument you don't usually play in that style'.

"One time he said, 'Imagine you're in a space station off the planet
Earth and Earth has died and you have to write a song about being
homesick for your planet'. We sat there going 'Er . . .' It was an
experience. I can phone Brian Eno up now!"

SOMEWHERE Chris Martin and Coldplay are diving into bags as Brian Eno
produces their next album.

"The thing they've done, which we didn't do, is they've got songs,"
Healy says. "I thought we'd just jam and get someone to put all the jams
together, which is what U2 do. They do it really well. I can't do that."


From
Online&tCategory=WhatsOn&itemid=NOED24%20May%202007%2016%3A33%3A23%3A873

   --

During their time away they got the chance to go into the studio with
music legend Brian Eno, which Andy says they found reinvigorating - if
slightly scary to start with. "It was pretty daunting. He's such an
influential man and made so many records we all love. He's amazing.
Really generous."

From the way Andy talks about the experience, you sense that it really
was make or break time for the band.

"We didn't go in with any songs - we just made music. It's not really
the way we work, but it was an exercise in freeing everyone up. I think
after that we felt 'we have got this in us to do it again'. There was an
enthusiasm there for doing it again," he says.

In fact it was a hugely creative time for the band.

"And for the first time we had many more songs than we needed. We used
to go in with nine songs - this time we had 30 or 40 and whittled it
down. It was so weird to pick an album. It took us two years to make the
record we wanted."



From
-good-band-down/2007/05/24/1179601532126.html?page=fullpage#contentSwap1

   --

About 40 songs were recorded for the project in what was a difficult
gestation. Much of the early sessions were scrapped altogether. With
session after session producing two or three new songs at a time, the
band felt they were writing music that was more concise, more "pop" and,
in the end, a bit less self-conscious.

Frontman Fran Healy is the band's chief lyricist. Primrose believes that
since Healy has become a father, a whole new emotional well has opened
up for him.

Most of the album was self-produced in various studios around London.
Former producer Nigel Godrich assisted on several sessions. The band
also completed a five-day stint with Brian Eno, creating experimental
music. Unfortunately, most of it will probably not see the light of day.

"It was great fun and very interesting," Primrose says. "It was very
cathartic and we'd love to do it again but it was one of those things
that when you listen back, we just sounded really pretentious."
	
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