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FCN No. 63  Thomas Brendler
 Mar 11, 2003 15:16 PST 
FOREST COMMUNITY NEWS

Published by the National Network of Forest Practitioners
Subscribe at www.topica.com/lists/nnfp-@igc.topica.com
Join the NNFP at www.nnfp.org/content/member.html

No. 63
March 11, 2003

SAVE THE DATES!

NNFP Annual Meeting
October 28-November 1, 2003
St. Helena Island, South Carolina
More details coming soon.

Week in Washington
June 2-5, 2003, Washington, DC
For more information, contact
Kim Ziegelmayer at ki-@nnfp.org


IN THIS ISSUE
NEWS
President Zeroes Out Economic Action Program
Payback Time? More Uncertainty Around ?Fire Borrowing?
Forest Service Issues Tongass Forest Management Plan
New Wildfire Bills Introduced
Small Lumber Mills Win One   
FEATURES
The Final Cut: Stiff Competition Hits Western Mills The Hardest
Heavy Equipment In Ecosystem Restoration
NATIONAL COMMUNITY FORESTRY CENTER: RESOURCES & TOOLS
FUNDING
POSITIONS, FELLOWSHIPS, AWARDS
GATHERINGS
WHERE DO I SIGN UP?

NEWS

PRESIDENT ZEROES OUT ECONOMIC ACTION PROGRAM
For the second year in a row, President Bush?s budget has zeroed-out the
Forest Service?s Economic Action Program. EAP is a small and
cost-effective program designed to strengthen the capacity of rural
communities, and a critical tool for stimulating innovation, delivering
technical assistance, and developing partnerships. With continued strong
support from the Senate, Congress did restored funding for the program
in its 2003, but the outlook for 2004 is uncertain. Since 2001, EAP has
also received additional funding to support projects related to the
National Fire Plan. Yet, despite the fact that in FY 2001 EAP
fire-related proposals increased four fold, funding remained the static,
and fell in 2003. For more information, contact Wendy Gerlitz
(503-449-0009; wger-@nnfp.org).

PAYBACK TIME? MORE UNCERTAINTY AROUND ?FIRE BORROWING?
EAP and other community-oriented projects were also hurt by the
so-called ?fire borrowing? that occurred in 2002, which diverted funds
from many Forest Service programs to cover the $1 billion overrun in
firefighting costs associated with last summer?s wildfires. The 2003
appropriations bill restored roughly 2/3 of these ?borrowed? funds, but
it is unclear and, frankly, unlikely that all funds will be restored to
the projects from which they were borrowed.

FOREST SERVICE ISSUES TONGASS NATIONAL FOREST MANAGEMENT PLAN
On Friday, February 28, 2003 the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) released the
Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) to the Tongass
National Forest Management Plan. In the SEIS, the USFS recommended no
new wilderness designations in the Tongass. As a result of a rider
attached to the FY?03 Omnibus spending bill passed last month, the
Tongass National Forest management plan is considered exempt from
judicial or administrative appeals. The agency, meanwhile, has made a
recommendation to Congress to designate an additional 1.4 million acres
of wilderness to the Chugach National Forest. To view the final SEIS to
the Tongass National Forest Management Plan see:
http://www.tongass-seis.net/seis/index.html


NEW WILDFIRE BILLS INTRODUCED

Wildfire Prevention Act of 2003 (H.R. 460, S. 32) would establish 3
institutes in the Interior West to develop, transfer, apply, monitor,
and continually fund restoration treatments that reduce wildfire risks
and improve forest health at a landscape scale.

Wildfire Prevention and Forest Health Protection Act (HR 387) would
authorize Regional Foresters on national forests to exempt tree thinning
projects in areas with high fuel loads or with dead or severely dying
trees from any provision of law, including the appeals process, in order
reduce the extraordinary wildfire threat on National Forest System
lands. The decision of the Regional Forester to exempt these areas will
need certification from the Chief of the USFS and Congress.

Wildfire Response Act of 2003 (H.R. 575) would no longer requires the
Secretary of Interior or the Secretary of Agriculture to compare costs
of military aircraft to commercial aircraft when procuring their
services to fight wildfires. The exception expedites the process when
utilizing military aircraft for wildfire suppression and states that the
concerned Secretary must submit to Congress a notice explaining the
reasons why the exception was used. For additional information and the
text of this legislation visit http://thomas.loc.gov

SMALL LUMBER MILLS WIN ONE
When New York state's new fire prevention and building codes went into
effect January 1, 2003 they had been rewritten to continue to exempt
small mills from a requirement that all wood milled as load-bearing
beams needed to be examined, certified as sturdy, and stamped as such.
Mills still must certify their products, but there was a logistical
problem with stamping, Rudy Stempel said. Stempel has been in the mill
business almost 50 years. For a mill Stempel's size ? one saw and
output of 200,000 board feet a year of mostly pine wood from trees in
the region ? the new rules would have cost $200 a day, effectively
putting him out of business. The new regulations, promulgated by the
state Department of State, also would have put scores of other small
wood millers out of business ? and even would have banned farmers from
cutting their own wood to build barns on their land. (Kevin Harlin,
TimesUnion, February 20, 2003). For the full article go to:
http://rdr.sbml.cc/Click?q=b5-509cQ7Ui9NuEZ_R1ENN3vZII


FEATURES

THE FINAL CUT: STIFF COMPETITION HITS WESTERN MILLS THE HARDEST
Nearly 150 North American mills have closed since 1995. Closure rates
are highest in the western United States. In recent years, the industry
has struggled with depressed prices, overproduction, higher log costs,
an influx of cheap lumber from Canada and other countries, and the
economic downturn from the ?Asian Flu.? Yet, even as companies padlocked
plants and sent workers home, the industry's production capacity rose by
16 percent. Survivors in the battle of the mills are extremely
efficient. They've cut labor costs and increased production through
automation. Often, they own timberland, too.

After 50 years as an industry leader, the West is losing market share to
mills in Canada and southern states. The Forest Service helped establish
the West as a leader in the timber industry after World War II. In the
Northwest, Forest Service timber harvests peaked in the late 1980s and
early 1990s. Shortly afterward, federal protections for spotted owl
habitat led to sharp reductions in sales in Western Oregon and
Washington. Endangered species listings for salmon, bull trout and lynx
reduced sales east of the Cascades. The timber industry soon found
itself facing other challenges ? supply ballooned, and prices dropped.

Meanwhile, the industry in the southern United States had gained
strength. Cotton fields abandoned during the 1930s were reforested and
ready for harvest. Private lands logged heavily in the early part of the
century attained their second growth. Harvesting trees is cheaper in the
flat terrain of the South, and longer days and warmer temperatures
translate into faster tree growth.

A resolution to the trade dispute with Canada could make an immediate
difference. If the amount of Canadian lumber were reduced, prices could
be raised. Normal profit margins are quite small in the industry. The
industry has also been creative at finding niche markets. Meanwhile, the
debate over timber supply from federal lands remains an ongoing
political issue. (Becky Kramer, Spokesman-Review, Feburary 17, 2003)
For more information and the full article contact Becky Kramer:
bec-@spokesman.com; (208) 765-7122; (800)344-6718.

HEAVY EQUIPMENT IN ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION
A new report, ?Heavy Equipment Work in Ecosystem Restoration: Estimated
Employment Contributions to Humboldt County, California During the 2002
Field Season,? measures the number of heavy equipment operators who
found work in ecosystem restoration in Humboldt County California and
surrounding areas last year. The preliminary report, released by the
North Coast Restoration Jobs Initiative, shows that at least 102 heavy
equipment operators were employed in ecosystem restoration during the
height of the field season, roughly from August to September of 2002.
The report compiles the results from 17 different restoration projects
throughout the North Coast region.

Humboldt County, located along California?s North Coast region, was once
a community heavily dependent upon natural resource extraction. During
the 1990s, the county was widely recognized as California?s epicenter
for the polarizing timber wars which raged throughout the forested
communities of the Northwest. Such disputes continue today, meanwhile,
Humboldt County?s high unemployment and relative abundance of low-wage
jobs indicates an urgent need for family wage job creation throughout
the region. Jim Smith, President of the Central Labor Council of Del
Norte and Humboldt Counties, sees ecosystem restoration as a potential
source of employment opportunities.

Ecosystem restoration has been a growing industry in the county for
decades, sparked when Congress established the Redwood National Park in
1968. These restoration businesses provide a foundation of local
contractors and restoration workers with the necessary capacity to plan
and implement a diverse array of restoration projects. Many of these
projects require the use of heavy equipment, particularly those projects
focused on road decommissioning and upgrading, culvert replacement,
stream bank stabilization, and in-stream boulder and large woody debris
placement.

The report does not, however, address wage levels, worker demographics,
or the comparison of figures from 2002 to previous years. The report
also does not discuss training needs, potential future job growth, and
other factors woven into the socio-economic mosaic of ecosystem
restoration. For more information or a copy of the report contact:
Andrea Davis (707) 498-4481 or ada-@inreach.com


NATIONAL COMMUNITY FORESTRY CENTER:
RESOURCES & TOOLS

In June 2000, the National Network of Forest Practitioners launched the
National Community Forestry Center, a groundbreaking effort designed to
improve the well-being of communities and forests by helping rural
people access, produce and use information. The NCFC?s four regional
centers use participatory research to people solve problems by
strengthening their capacity to ask and answer questions that are
important to their communities, cultures, and forests. At the national
level, NCFC serves as NNFP?s clearinghouse for resources, tools, and
practical information for people involved in community forestry.

ASK A RESEARCHER
The Southwest Community Forestry Research Center, one of the NCFC?s four
regional centers, is inviting inquiries about the work of the Center or
specific questions related to forestry issues or opportunities from
community members. Please email Martha Schumann
(mar-@theforesttrust.org) with the inquiry including the following
information: Name, Phone number, Affiliation (business, tribe, community
organization, other), Address, Request or question. The Center will do
its best to respond by email or phone within 48 hours.

THE USE OF BIOMASS ENERGY FROM HAZARDOUS FUEL REDUCTION PROJECTS
This report by the Southwest Community Forestry Research Center compiles
information about the use of biomass energy from the USDA Forest Service
and presents national, local, and environmental perspectives on biomass
energy use and implementation. This and other publications are free for
residents of the Southwest. Please call 1-800-803-0025 or email
to-@theforesttrust.org or visit: www.theforesttrust.org/research.html.

DISTRIBUTION OF TIMBER SALES ON DIXIE AND FISHLAKE NATIONAL FORESTS,
1985-2001: AN EVALUATION OF SUPPORT TO SMALL, LOCAL COMPANIES
This report by the Southwest Community Forestry Research Center is a
participatory research project analyzes timber sales on two national
forests in southern Utah. This and other publications are free for
residents of the Southwest. Please call 1-800-803-0025 or email
to-@theforesttrust.org or visit: www.theforesttrust.org/research.html.

RESEARCH PROJECTS DATABASE AND FOREST BILLS DATABASE FOR THE NORTHERN
FOREST REGION
As part of NCFC?s mission to make research results more accessible for
community benefit, the NCFC Northern Forest Region (NCFCNFR) has begun
to compile descriptions of research projects in the Northeastern United
States into a user-friendly database that can be freely accessed by the
public. The NCFCNFR has also recently compiled a searchable database of
forest-related bills introduced during the 2001 and 2002 legislatives
sessions for all four states in the Northern Forest Region. Information
on legislative initiatives can be used to identify topics of concern
across all four states of the Northern Forest, compare and contrast
language related to similar issues across states, and identify the
legislators involved in forestry issues in our region. Visit
www.ncfcnfr.net to access these databases.

TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE FOR COMMUNITY MAPPING PROJECT: THE FOREST
TRUST'S MAPPING WORKBOOK
The Forest Trust has developed a method for communities to map projects
of the National Fire Plan. To make the mapping process accessible to a
broader audience, the Forest Trust is publishing a workbook that details
the steps involved in conducting a community-mapping project. Topics
covered by the workbook include how to gather information, how to map
the information, and suggestions for analysis. The general mapping
process can also be used to monitor and analyze many other
forest-related issues. The Southwest Regional Center of the National
Community Forestry Center and the Forest Trust, which houses the Center,
will be conducting a community mapping pilot project. The Center is
seeking communities interested in developing a mapping project. If you
are interested in starting a community mapping project, contact Tori
Derr, (505) 983-8992, ext. 36, (800) 803-0025, or
to-@theforesttrust.org

THE RESTORATION JOBS NEWS SERVICE OF THE ALLIANCE FOR SUSTAINABLE JOBS
AND THE ENVIRONMENT
The Restoration Jobs News Service will provide a vital new link to
information about the emerging Restoration Economy in the Pacific
Northwest and beyond. The Service is an online journal reporting
advances in natural resource management that reflect an integrated
approach to resolving some of the region?s most challenging economic,
social and environmental problems. The News Service will help you
connect with the diverse and creative leadership dedicated to building a
restoration economy, address a range of critical topics relating to
restoration jobs, and trace the outlines of a blueprint for a new
restoration economy. If you are interested in subscribing, contact:
Alliance for Sustainable Jobs and the Environment, PO Box 2760, Olympia,
WA 98507, (360) 570-0718, cv-@igc.org

NORTHWEST ECONOMIC ADJUSTMENT INITIATIVE: SEEING THE COMMUNITIES THROUGH
THE TREES: REBUILDING COMMUNITIES IN THE NORTHWEST
This document, prepared by Forest Community Research, examines the
results of the Northwest Economic Adjustment Initiative. The analysis
includes a study of 35 communities in 31 individual case studies. The
initiative projects were examined in terms of how they affect five
dimensions of community capacity: (1) physical capital, (2) financial
capital, (3) human capital, (4) cultural capital, and (5) social
capital. For more information visit the web site at
www.-@FCResearch.org

THE REGIONAL COMMUNITY FORESTRY TRAINING CENTER NEWSLETTER
The World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD) which was held in
Johannesburg, South Africa in August of 2002 included a parallel
citizens and NGO conference called the Global Peoples' Forum. One
outcome of the conferences was the work done on behalf of community
forestry, including a monthly E-News newsletter which provides "news and
information on community forestry related activities and issues"
throughout the world. You can subscribe to the listserv for the
newsletter by visiting www.recoftc.org

USDA FOREST SERVICE INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS E-NEWSLETTER ?GLOBAL LEAFLET?
The latest issue of Global Leaflet is available online at
http://www.fs.fed.us/global/news/   This issue features articles on
reduced-impact logging, a technique designed to minimize the
disturbances and problems associated with conventional logging.
Reduced-impact logging is becoming a part of many national and
international forestry efforts, due to its ecological and economic
benefits.

NATIONAL FIRE NEWS: WILDLAND FIRES OF 2002 SUMMARY ? A SEASON OF
CHALLENGE AND ACCOMPLISHMENT.
A report from the National Interagency Fire Center available at:
http://www.nifc.gov/fireinfo/nfn.html

HAYMAN FIRE STUDY
Scientists from the U.S. Forest Service released results from the study
of the Hayman fire last week. The study found that forest thinning
projects and prescribed burns mitigate risks to communities and water
supplies by reducing erosion and the likelihood of fires supported by
crown fires. For more information see:
http://www.fs.fed.us/rm/hayman_fire/

BUSINESS AND EMPLOYMENT EFFECTS OF THE NATIONAL FIRE PLAN IN OREGON AND
WASHINGTON, FY 2001.
This publication uses procurement data from FY 2001 to evaluate the
impacts of the National Fire Plan on businesses and communities. For
example, it discusses the impact of the Title IV authority, which allows
the federal land management agencies to consider local community benefit
when awarding fire hazard reduction contracts. This document is
available on line at http://ewp.uoregon.edu or you can get a hard copy
by calling (541) 346-0675

MULTIPARTY MONITORING FOR SUSTAINABLE NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
This publication is a guidebook for community-based, multi-party
monitoring. It focuses on the economic and ecological impacts of
ecosystem management and community forestry, especially the
implementation of the National Fire Plan. The guidebook offers modules
to help communities and their agency partners monitor: employment
results (quality job), utilization of by products, grants and other
investments, and ecological effects of fire restoration efforts. this
publication can be found at http://ewp.uoregon.edu/guidebook or
http://thewatershedcenter.org at no charge. It can also be purchased
for $25 (inc. shipping and handling) by calling (541) 346-0675.

HEAVY EQUIPMENT IN ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION: PUTTING HUMBOLDT COUNTY,
CALIFORNIA BACK TOGETHER AGAIN
?Heavy Equipment Work in Ecosystem Restoration: Estimated Employment
Contributions to Humboldt County, California During the 2002 Field
Season? has been released by the North Coast Restoration Jobs
Initiative. The report measures the number of heavy equipment operators
who found work in ecosystem restoration in Humboldt County California
and surrounding areas last year. For more information or a copy of the
report contact: Andrea Davis (707) 498-4481 or ada-@inreach.com

A SURVEY OF INNOVATIVE CONTRACTING FOR QUALITY JOBS AND ECOSYSTEM
MANAGEMENT
This study reviews 9 innovative contracting experiments in the Pacific
Northwest (including 4 stewardship pilot projects). It considers the
impact that these new contracting mechanisms can have on ecosystem
management and quality jobs. This document is available on line at
http://ewp.uoregon.edu or you can get a hard copy by calling (541)
346-0675.

REVIEW OF USDA FOREST SERVICE COMMUNITY-BASED WATERSHED RESTORATION
PARTNERSHIPS: ANALYSIS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
The USDA Forest Service initiated the Community-Based Watershed
Restoration Partnerships in 1999 to demonstrate how the agency can best
engage in and support landscape-level, community-based management. The
program represents a significant investment by the Forest Service in
funding and resource commitment, and it represents a significant
investment as well by numerous partners. This report is a formative
evaluation of fifteen watersheds from across the country selected to
participate in the program. To view the report go to:
http://cwch.uoregon.edu/

SUSTAINABLE OPTIONS FOR SOFTWOOD LUMBER TRADE BETWEEN THE U.S. AND
CANADA
This report can be downloaded from www.ecosystem.org. Paper copies can
be obtained from the Northwest Ecosystem Alliance, Defenders of Wildlife
or the Natural Resources Defense Council.

NEW YORK-NEW JERSEY HIGHLANDS REPORT
According to the USFS report released Thursday, the 2 million acre
Appalachian Highlands are facing threats from suburban development. The
report found that 3400 acres of forest land were lost to development
annually between 1995 and 2000. The forest land loss is affecting water
reservoirs, migratory flyways and critical habitat loss. To see a copy
of the draft report see:
http://www.nynjtc.org/issues/2002/highlands.html

SMALL SAWMILL OPERATOR'S MANUAL & CIRCULAR SAWMILLS AND THEIR EFFICIENT
OPERATION
By Stanford J. Lunstrum, these publications are available at no charge
and can be ordered by contacting Kathy Walker, Technology Marketing
Unit, at 608-231-9504 or kcwa-@fs.fed.us

NONTIMBER FOREST PRODUCTS IN THE UNITED STATES
Edited by E. Jones, R. McLain, J. Weigand, this 424-page anthology
provides the first comprehensive examination of commercial nontimber
forest products (NTFPs) in the United States. The thirty-two
contributors review the state of scientific knowledge of NTFPs by
offering a survey of commercial and noncommercial products, an overview
of uses and users, and discussions of sustainable management issues
associated with ecology, cultural traditions, forest policy, and
commerce. To order contact: University Press of Kansas: (785) 864-4155;
http://www.kansaspress.ku.edu/jonnon.html

COMMUNITY FORESTRY IN THE UNITED STATES: LEARNING FROM THE PAST,
CRAFTING THE FUTURE
Written by Mark Baker and Jonathan Kusel, this book is an analytically
rigorous and historically informed assessment of the community forestry
movement. It examines the current state of community forestry through a
grounded assessment of where it stands now and where it might go in the
future. The book not only clarifies the state of the movement, but also
suggests a trajectory and process for its continued development. To
order go to: www.islandpress.com

THE FOREST SHOP
The Forest Shop is a small, specialty independent bookseller committed
to finding and telling people about the best books and reference
materials on forestry and the outdoors. Their winter 2002 catalog
includes categories such as: Agroforestry; Forest History; Forest
Management; Insects and Diseases; Logging and Sawmilling; Medicinal,
Edible and Poisonous Plants; Silviculture; and Urban and Community
Forestry. For more information call (613) 233-4283, email:
ma-@forestshop.com, www.forestshop.com

AMERICAN BAR ASSOCIATION (ABA) INITIATES PRO BONO LEGAL ASSISTANCE FOR
COMMUNITY PROJECTS
The American Bar Association's Special Committee on Second Generation
Issues announced the initiation of Pro Bono Legal Assistance for
Communities ("PBLAC") pilot project in early April 2002. The pilot
project attempts to match the legal assistance needs of communities
undertaking environmental projects with volunteer attorneys from the ABA
Section on Environment, Energy and Resources who will provide pro bono
(free) legal support for specifically defined tasks/projects. The types
of assistance available under the PBLAC may include: analysis,
counseling, policy development, drafting of sustainable development
tools, facilitation, mediation, alternative dispute resolution, and
other non-litigation types of support. Communities interested in
participating in PBLAC should complete an application. For more
information go to the ABA website.
http://www.abanet.org/environ/pubservice6.html

MEDIA/PUBLIC RELATIONS WEBSITES
The Importance of Media:
http://www.BrockU.CA/commstudies/courses/Peter/mediaseminar/
Lists important points on how to deal with all aspects of media
relations
P.R. Planet: http://olypen.com/creativemedia/LO/ Links to web media
contacts as well as news sites and PR and Media resources
http://www.charityvillage.com/charityvillage/research/med.html Public
Relations articles format with search database, nonprofit focus
http://www.gebbieinc.com/ Award winning media directory site for
electronic media sources. Includes PR tips and tricks section for
electronic media
http://www.mediarelations.com/ Variety of feature stories on publicity
(how to guidelines), quizzes, technology information (click on
newspaper)
http://www.infocomgroup.com/ Includes hot media news section with
current media contact changes, and links to a variety of PR sites
http://www.usprnet.com/ Includes vendor search engine, Internet
marketing 1000 search engines, PR communications business news and PR
marketplace section(products and services)
Green Media Toolshed (http://www.greenmediatoolshed.org) is a nonprofit
organization that provides media outreach tools to the environmental
community.

SPANISH NON-TIMBER FOREST PRODUCTS (NTFP) WEBSITE
Those of you who understand Spanish might find it interesting to visit
the Mexico-based NTFP page: www.manejoypfnm.org.mx



FUNDING
EPA ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION FUNDS
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is accepting applications
for grants that can be used to fund innovative ways to educate the
public about the environment. Schools, universities, not-for-profit
organizations, tribal education agencies, and state and local
governments are all eligible to apply for the grants. Applications fall
into two categories: nationally significant projects costing more than
$25,000, and local efforts costing less than
$25,000. Grants for the larger amounts are issued by EPA headquarters,
while the smaller grants are issued by EPA's regional offices. Please
note that these funds can be used bi-nationally: More information about
the grant program and application forms are available at:
http://www.epa.gov/enviroed/grants.html For more information: contact
Deirdre Nurre in Region IX at 415-947-4290.

POSITIONS, FELLOWSHIPS, AWARDS

Field Coordinator, The Center for Watershed and Community Health (CWCH)
Springfield, OR. http://cwch.uoregon.edu/

Sustainable Forests Program Coordinator, WildLaw, Montgomery, AL.
www.wildlaw.org

Executive Director, Colorado Rural Development Council.
http://www.ruralcolorado.org

Forester, Fsc Sustainable Forestry Certification Program.
www.adirondackresidents.org


GATHERINGS

NNFP ANNUAL MEETING
October 28-November 1, 2003, St. Helena Island, South Carolina. More
details coming soon.

WEEK IN WASHINGTON
June 2-5, 2003, Washington, DC. Meet key policy makers and interest
groups, learn how the federal government works (and doesn?t work), and
bring home the tools you need to get involved.
For more information: Kim Ziegelmayer at (401) 273-6507 or
ki-@nnfp.org.   

CLIMATE CHANGE INFORMATION SERIES: IMPACTS AND ADAPTATION IN THE PRAIRIE
PROVINCES FORESTS AND FOREST INDUSTRY
March 10, 2003, Winnipeg, Manitoba. This one-day workshop will showcase
current research projects in the Prairie Provinces forests. For
registration and additional information: There is no registration fee,
but we ask that you please register in advance by contacting:
Manitoba Model Forest, tel: (204) 367-5232, e-mail:
du-@manitobamodelforest.net

2ND BIENNIAL INTERNATIONAL SUSTAINABILITY INDICATORS NETWORK MEETING
March 13-16, 2003, Toronto, Canada. The meeting will highlight
indicators used at all scales as well as methods to expand the effective
use of indicators across political and geographic boundaries. Contact
Sarah Ossoff or Michele Goodwin at (978) 975-1939 or email
adm-@sustainabilityindicators.org

TOOLING UP FOR CHANGE: MOHICAN CONSERVATION WORKSHOP
March 14-16, 2003, Blairstown, NJ. Learn how to protect the places you
enjoy on for hiking, wildlife viewing and depend on for drinking water -
from the undeveloped forest in your town to the ridge tops of the
Highlands. This is a weekend training on effective and practical
techniques for working with media, communicating with elected officials,
and recruiting others to join your effort. For more information call AMC
Conservation Outreach Coordinator Bryan Wentzell at
bwent-@amcinfo.org or (617)523-0655, ext. 386 and
to register contact Eric Houden at mohi-@mindspring.com or (908)
362-5670.

FIREWISE COMMUNITIES NATIONAL WORKSHOP
March 17-19, 2003, Ashland, Oregon. Firewise is an organization that
works with communities to raise awareness and identify resources
regarding strategies to help minimize the property damage and financial
loss related to wildfire and consequently make these communities more
Firewise. For more information contact Neil Benson, (541) 664-3328,
nben-@odf.state.or.us

THE 31ST ANNUAL WOOD TECHNOLOGY CLINIC AND SHOW
March 19-21, 2003, Portland, Oregon. "Providing the Tools That Shape the
Future" is the theme, Three quality educational tracks will also be
featured: Production Practices, Business Management, and Industry
Outlook and Markets. For more information or to register, visit
http://www.woodwideweb.com or call 800-933-8735 (770-291-5409).

TRI-STATE FORESTRY CONFERENCE
March 22, 2003, Keokuk, IA. Forest health and management conference for
landowners from Iowa, Missouri, and Illinois. For more information: call
(515) 294-1168; email: ph-@iastate.edu;
www.ag.iastate.edu/departments/forestry/ext/keokuk.pdf

SAF FIELD SEMINAR SERIES 2003
Seminar participants will use Web-based GIS land management applications
to map forestland; edit databases; evaluate and track stand history;
perform transaction-based silvicultural and timber sale planning;
perform forest implementation and tracking; and run database queries and
reports. For information on the SAF Field Seminar Series, contact Terry
Clark, SAF's science and education manager, 5400 Grosvenor Lane,
Bethesda, MD 20814-2198; (301) 897-8720, ext. 123; fax (301) 897-3690;
cla-@safnet.org, or visit the SAF website at
http://www.safnet.org/meetings/fsspmg.htm

HARVESTER INVOLVEMENT IN INVENTORYING AND MONITORING OF NONTIMBER FOREST
PRODUCTS (NTFPs) IN THE NORTHEASTERN REGION
April 3, 2003, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Anyone interested in the
sustainable management of nontimber forest products, including federal,
tribal, state, and private land managers,
harvesters and buyers, extension agents, policy makers and scientists.
For more information and to pre-register, please contact Katie Lynch no
later than March 20th, (503)-320-1323;
ktly-@ifcae.org, www.ifcae.org

CONSERVATION EASEMENT WORKSHOPS
April 4, May 16, and June 6, 2003. Conservation Easements and Other Land
Preservation Techniques, in Elizabeth City, NC, the Pitt County Center
in Greenville, NC, and the Wake County Center in Raleigh, NC. Go to
http://www.cals.ncsu.edu/lpn/ for more information

VIRGINIA TECH WORKSHOP
Utilization of Low-Grade Hardwood
April 11-12, Roanoke, Virginia. This workshop is targeted for hardwood
lumber producers who want to increase their markets for lower grade
lumber and who want to better understand secondary processors' needs. It
is also for secondary producers who are looking for methods to decrease
production costs and adjust to changing raw material requirements. For
additional information, contact Bob Smith at 540-231-9759 or
rsmi-@vt.edu .

NATIONAL TRIBAL SUSTAINABILITY CONFERENCE
April 15-16, 2003, Hyatt Regency Tamaya Resort and Spa, New Mexico.
Hosted by the Council of Energy Resource Tribes and the Pueblo of Santa
Ana, this conference will include a timely focus on biomass technology.
For more information: www.CERTRedEarth.com, If you will be paying by
credit card you may register on-line at http://www.regonline.com/?7668.
If you would like to pay by check or purchase order please complete the
registration form and fax it to Mary at 303-282-7584.

10TH ANNUAL WORKSHOP ON FOREST PRODUCTS MARKETING
April 24-25, 2003, Blacksburg, Virginia. Topics include forest products
marketing overview, definition of marketing, distribution, pricing,
promotion, strategy, and marketing research and trends. For registration
materials or additional information, contact Bob Smith, Center for
Forest Products Marketing and Management, Virginia Tech, by phone
(540-231-5876), fax (540-231-8868), or e-mail (rsmi-@vt.edu).

SOUTHWEST FIRE INITIATIVE CONFERENCE
April 29, 2003, Northern Arizona State University, Arizona. The results
of two years research will be presented on topics ranging from
ecological effects of severe wildfires to ways in which western
communities are developing collaborative restoration projects.
Registration and program information are available at www.eri.nau.edu

VIRGINIA TECH WORKSHOP
Lean Manufacturing
May 5-6, Blacksburg, Virginia. Simply defined, lean manufacturing is a
method of doing more with less. This workshop is designed for upper and
mid-level production managers who want to learn how to successfully
implement lean manufacturing concepts in their business. For all details
visit: www.conted.vt.edu/leanman/

NORTHEASTERN FOREST PRODUCTS EQUIPMENT 2003 EXPO
May 16-17, 2003, Bangor, Maine. The Northeastern Forest Products
Equipment Expo will showcase logging, sawmilling, and pallet equipment
show in the Northeast. Seminars on chainsaw maintenance and safety,
ethics and images, and basic hydraulics will also be held during the
Expo. For more information: www.nefpexpo.com or contact the Expo main
office at 315-369-3736 (ne-@telenet.net).

CONSERVING BIODIVERSITY IN WORKING FORESTS
May 28-31, 2003, Sewanee, Tennessee. The Forest Stewards Guild 2003
Annual Conference will include technical workshops, tours, and
discussions on the role of the working forest landscape in biodiversity
conservation. For more information: (505) 983-3887;
in-@foreststewardsguild.org; www.foreststewardguild.org


4TH ANNUAL LANDOWNER CONFERENCE: INCOME OPPORTUNITIES FROM FIELD &
FOREST
June 8-9, 2003, Hocking County, OH. Forest management, special forest
products, business development, and more. For more information: (740)
767-2090; fore-@ruralaction.org, www.ruralaction.org/conference.html

2ND ANNUAL SUSTAINABLE FOREST MANAGEMENT SUMMIT
June 9-11, 2003, Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada. The goal of this
meeting is to provide a broad forum to critically discuss emerging
forest resource issues in the Great Lakes Region and a venue for natural
resource professionals and stakeholders to exchange views and network on
sustainable forestry issues. For more information call Wendy Hinrichs
Sanders, P.O. Box 722, Hayward, WI, phone: (715) 634-2006, email:
fore-@lsfa.org, www.lsfa.org

FOREST HEALTH SUMMIT
June 17-19, 2003, Missoula, Montana. The meeting will review and discuss
the latest scientific efforts to assist forest health projects,
implementation of the 10-year strategy and the President's Healthy
Forest Initiative, budgetary and legislative issues, and the status of
the 2003 fire season. For more information see
http://www.westgov.org/wga/meetings/forest_health_summit.htm

NATIONAL URBAN AND COMMUNITY FORESTRY EDUCATION AND OUTREACH CONFERENCE
FOR MINORITY AND UNDERSERVED COMMUNITIES
June 18-20, 2003, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. For more information visit:
www.urbanforestry.subr.edu/nucfac or email zni-@subr.edu

PATHWAYS TO FOREST SUSTAINABILITY: PUTTING THE PIECES TOGETHER
June 30-July 2, 2003, Jacksonville, FL. This conference aims to bring
together foresters, loggers, landowners, and wildlife biologists to
discuss common sense ideas of sustainable forest management. For more
information on the conference, visit the E6 Working Group's website at
www.safnet.org/science/e6.htm or contact Terry Clark, SAF's science and
education manger at cla-@safnet.org or (301) 897-8720, ext. 123.

JOINT VENTURES: PARTNERS IN STEWARDSHIP
November 17-20, 2003, Los Angeles, California. This conference will
enable participants to explore the changing nature of communities,
examine models of shared leadership, build skills needed to nurture and
cultivate partnerships, and influence the emerging nationwide network of
public places. Consider submitting a proposal for a conference
session?the deadline is May 3, 2003. For more information, visit
www.partnerships2003.org or call Susan Alden 510-559-6342.

ENHANCING THE SOUTHERN APPALACHIAN FOREST RESOURCE
October 2-3, 2003, Hendersonville, NC. The symposium will have three
topic areas: Innovative Approaches, A New Look at Traditional
Approaches, and The Forest in the Community. Contact Susan Moore at
susan_-@ncsu.edu, (919) 515-3184, or go to
www.ncsu.edu/feop/symposium


WHERE DO I SIGN UP?


JOINT VENTURES: PARTNERS IN STEWARDSHIP
November 17-20, 2003, Los Angeles, California. This conference will
enable participants to explore the changing nature of communities,
examine models of shared leadership, build skills needed to nurture and
cultivate partnerships, and influence the emerging nationwide network of
public places. Consider submitting a proposal for a conference
session?the deadline is May 3, 2003. For more information, visit
www.partnerships2003.org or call Susan Alden 510-559-6342.


FY ?04 FOREST SERVICE BUDGET REQUEST
The House Interior Appropriations Subcommitee heard testimony from Dale
Bosworth, Chief of the U.S. Forest Service regarding the
Administration?s FY ?04 $4.06 billion budget request. The subcommittee
they will accept written testimony from interested parties. This written
testimony is due April 3, 2003. For more information and the
specifications for written testimony submission visit:
http://www.house.gov/appropriations/hearings/hear04in.htm




____________________________________________________________
Editors: Kim Ziegelmayer and Thomas Brendler. Special thanks to: Natasha
Sitarz at American Forests, Michael Goergen of SAF, Kate Fernholz of
Community Forestry Connections, the Center for Biological Diversity, and
Forest Trust.

The mission of the National Network of Forest Practitioners is to
promote the mutual well being of workers, rural communities, and forests
by supporting individuals and groups that build sustainable
relationships between forests and people. NNFP is a grassroots alliance
of rural people who are striving to build a forest economy that is
ecologically sound and socially just. As one of the leading community
forestry organizations in the United States, the NNFP provides
information and technical assistance, a forum for networking and
organizing, and a meaningful role in national discussions about forests
and rural communities. To join the network or to obtain more
information, send an email to in-@nnfp.org and include your regular
mail address.

Suggestions and submissions for FCN are always welcome. Send them to
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