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FCN No. 70  Thomas Brendler
 Nov 19, 2003 13:53 PST 

FOREST COMMUNITY NEWS

Published by the National Network of Forest Practitioners
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No. 70
November 19, 2003


IN THIS ISSUE

NEWS
Interior Appropriations Bill Sent To White House
Omnibus Appropriations Bill
Healthy Forests Legislation
Senate Passes Agriculture Appropriations Bill
Energy Policy Act
Panel To Investigate Reducing Fire Fighting Costs
Environmental Rules Outweigh Costs, White House Study Says

NNFP NATIONAL COMMUNITY FORESTRY CENTER: RESOURCES & TOOLS
FUNDING
POSITIONS, FELLOWSHIPS, AWARDS
MEETINGS & WORKSHOPS
WHERE DO I SIGN UP?

NEWS

INTERIOR APPROPRIATIONS BILL SENT TO WHITE HOUSE
Congress passed legislation setting FY 2004 funding levels for
Department of Interior and US Forest Service programs. The President is
expected to sign the legislation into law soon.   The bill increases
spending levels for the Forest Service by $29 million and for the Bureau
of Land Management by $30 million. It also includes $2.5 billion for FY
2004 Forest Service and BLM National Fire Plan activities, over $400
million above the President's request. $301 million in emergency funds
are allocated to reimburse the Forest Service and $99 million to
reimburse the Bureau of Land Management for funds transferred from
program accounts in 2003 to cover wildfire suppression efforts. The
Forest Inventory and Analysis program received an increase of $14
million above the President's request for FY 2004. Conferees also voted
to limit funding for studies of outsourcing Forest Service and other
Interior jobs (“competitive sourcing”) by placing caps on the money each
department could spend on studies- $ 5 million for the Forest Service
and $2.5 million for the Interior Department. Other limitations and
reporting requirements for competitive sourcing activities in the
Interior Department are included in the bill. For detailed information
on the conference report visit
http://thomas.loc.gov/home/approp/app04.html

OMNIBUS APPROPRIATIONS BILL
Congress is expected to pass an omnibus bill that includes at least 5
other appropriations bills that are still in negotiations. This omnibus
bill is likely to include the fiscal year 2004 Agriculture
Appropriations bill and the Healthy Forests Restoration Act of 2003,
both discussed below.

HEALTHY FORESTS LEGISLATION
The Senate passed the Healthy Forests Restoration Act of 2003 (HR 1904)
with amendments by a vote of 80-14. Several amendments passed including:
the compromise agreement reached between Senate Democrats and
Republicans that replaces Title I (Hazardous Fuel Reductions on Federal
Lands) of the bill, the Firefighters Medical Monitoring Act (authorizes
OSHA to monitor long-term health of firefighters), the Disaster Air
Quality Monitoring Act (authorizes EPA regional offices to monitor
hazardous air pollutants and to report information on websites on a
daily basis), an amendment authorizing a collaborative monitoring,
evaluation, and accountability process for forest management projects
implemented using the provisions in this bill, and an amendment to
require the use of best-value contracting for projects carried out under
the bill. The Senate and the House are currently in negotiations to
resolve differences between the differing versions of the bill passed by
the House and Senate. If an agreement is reached, the bill will likely
become part of an omnibus-spending bill expected to be passed by
Congress before the end of this session. Congressional leaders reported
today that a deal is close. The Senate bill includes language that
protects old-growth forests in exchange for restrictions on appeals of
logging projects, and unlike the House bill, it would avoid using
proceeds from timber sales to pay for fuel-reduction projects by
authorizing $760 million annually, with a requirement that at least half
of those funds be used in wildland-urban border areas near residential
communities. Visit http://www.eenews.net/EEDaily/HFchart.htm for a
breakdown of outstanding issues in the two bills. Or for additional
information and to read the text of the Senate approved legislation
visit http://thomas.loc.gov


SENATE PASSES AGRICULTURE APPROPRIATIONS BILL
The Senate passed the FY 2004 Agriculture Appropriations bill this past
week. The bill (HR 2673/S 1427) allocates $17 billion in discretionary
money for the Department of Agriculture. Included in the bill is $826
million for the Natural Resource Conservation Service Conservation
Operations, $21.7 million for Cooperative Forestry Research, $4.516
million for the Renewable Resources Extension Act and $180 million for
the National Research Initiative Competitive Grants Program. The Senate
defeated, 38-56, an amendment that would have barred funds for four
conservation entitlement programs from being used to pay for technical
assistance in the Conservation Reserve Program. The bill will now be
referred to a joint conference committee of House and Senate members.
For more info visit http://thomas.loc.gov/home/approp/app04.html

ENERGY POLICY ACT
The House gave final approval yesterday to the most comprehensive energy
legislation since 1992 after Republican leaders said it would create
800,000 jobs, spur investment in the overburdened electricity grid and
reduce dependence on foreign energy supplies. Included in the proposed
conference report are provisions that will require an inventory and
assessment of renewable energy resources in the United States and
incentives for facilities that produce energy from renewable resources,
including biomass. The definition of biomass in this section allows for
the use of any of the following forest-related resources: mill residues,
precommercial thinnings, slash, and brush, or nonmerchantable material;
as well as solid wood waste materials and plants grown exclusively for
electricity production. Additionally, the conference report includes a
requirement that 7.5% of the energy consumed by the Federal government
will come from renewable resources by 2011 and provisions for grants to
improve the commercial value of biomass. For this section biomass
consists of trees and woody plants and byproducts of preventive
treatment that are removed to reduce hazardous fuels or to reduce the
risk of or to contain disease or insect infestation. The report
authorizes $50 million per fiscal year through 2014 for this section.
The bill now heads to the Senate for final passage. For the full text of
the proposed conference report visit
http://energy.senate.gov/legislation/energybill2003/energybill2003.cfm

PANEL TO INVESTIGATE REDUCING FIRE FIGHTING COSTS
The Wildland Fire Leadership Council, a coalition of federal agencies
and Western government interests, will convene a blue ribbon panel to
examine ways to contain the skyrocketing costs of fighting wildfires on
public lands. The Forest Service spent $1.02 billion fighting wildfires
in fiscal year 2003, while Interior spent $311 million. With
firefighting costs exceeding both agencies budgets, each borrowed money
from other program accounts to pay the extra costs. That extra money
will not likely be restored, officials said. The blue ribbon panel is
expected to be in place by the end of the year, with recommendations
ready by the next wildfire season, said Interior spokesman John Wright.
The Wildland Fire Leadership Council is composed of representatives from
Interior, the Forest Service, Federal Emergency Management Agency, the
Western Governors Association, the National Association of Counties, the
Intertribal Timber Council and the National Association of State
Foresters. The council also pledged to go ahead with implementing
LANDFIRE, a computer system developed by the Forest Service and Interior
that will allow the agencies to document field conditions, risks and
hazards. A prototype program in Montana was successful in allowing
managers to identify and treat areas at the highest fire risk.

ENVIRONMENTAL RULES OUTWEIGH COSTS, WHITE HOUSE STUDY SAYS
The White House office in charge of reviewing federal regulations has
reported that the benefits of some major environmental rules appear to
exceed the costs by several times. The Office of Management and Budget
examined a sampling of major rules and found that the total benefits --
to the extent they can be measured -- were at least triple the costs.
The 233-page report counted the costs and benefits of only a handful of
the 4,135 final rules published in the Federal Register during the
fiscal year that ended on Sept. 30, 2002. The principal focus this year
was on three rules issued during that year by the Energy Department, the
Transportation Department, and the EPA. They imposed estimated annual
costs of $1.6 billion to $2 billion but produced estimated annual
benefits of $2.4 billion to $6.5 billion. Looking back at 107 major
regulations issued from 1992 to 2002, the budget office calculated that
estimated annual costs were $36.6 billion to $42.8 billion, and annual
benefits were $146.8 billion to $230.9 billion. For every dollar spent
complying with these regulations, the public got at least three to eight
dollars in benefits.   The New York Times, 28 Sept 2003. [To download
report:
http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/inforeg/regpol-reports_congress.html]
Source: GreenClips. For information on subscriptions, email
chrish-@greenclips.com

WORLD FORESTRY CONGRESS
The News of the Congress (October 2003) is posted on the web site
http://cfm2003.org/images/upload/News_of_the_Congress.pdf


NNFP’S NATIONAL COMMUNITY FORESTRY CENTER:
RESOURCES & TOOLS

NETWORK TO LOG WORLD FOREST LOSS
In a new strategy to guard what's left of the world's original forests,
conservationists have created a global network and website to keep tabs
on where trees are coming under the saw. Global Forest Watch (GFW),
announced last week, combines satellite technology and old-fashioned
legwork to create detailed forest maps that reveal activities such as
illegal logging.
http://www.globalforestwatch.org/english/index.htm

OLD GROWTH IN THE EAST: A SURVEY
The long awaited update of Old Growth in the East: A Survey (2003) by
Mary Byrd Davis has been completed. It catalogs known old growth forests
on public and private lands for most states in the eastern United
States. The survey is a landmark, and stands as the culmination of over
10 years of work by many researchers and contributors. The catalog is
fully sourced, and describes what has happened with regard to the issue
since the catalog was first released in 1993. It will be a definitive
source for years to come. Available at www.old-growth.org or the Eastern
Old Growth Clearinghouse. Click on "news" for ordering information.
Paper copies of the 250 page booklet are $35; a lower cost CD will soon
be available.

THE INTERNATIONAL TREE-RING DATA BANK
The ITRDB contains over 3,300 tree-ring chronologies and over 2,400
measurement data sets from around the world, representing data from over
100 species in more than 50 countries. The ITRDB is housed at the
National Geophysical Data Center in Boulder, Colorado. This site has
numerous, very useful links to software for graphing tree-ring data, and
has an excellent search engine that allows easy retrieval and
downloading of all the tree-ring data sets.
http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/paleo/treering.html

NEW DISCUSSION GROUP ABOUT PARTICIPATORY RESEARCH
At this year’s US Community Forestry Research Fellowship (CFRF) annual
workshop, held last month in Seabeck, Washington, there was a
stimulating discussion about participatory research -- what it is, its
historical antecedents, tools for engaging the community, and issues in
using it in one’s own research. Due to time constraints, all the
questions raised during the four-hour session were not addressed. An
email discussion group has been established to permit discussion of
these questions, and/or to continue the discussion on topics not
covered, using email. Those interested are invited to join this
discussion group. Your participation is welcome whether you were at the
annual workshop in Seabeck or not. To join, direct you browser to
http://nature.berkeley.edu/mailman/listinfo/cfpr, and fill in the
information requested. Alternatively, you may go to the CFRF website
(http://www.cnr.berkeley.edu/community_forestry/) and click on the link
to the community forestry and participatory research discussion group.

TRIBAL TOURISM TOOLKIKT
The Tribal Tourism Toolkit produced for the National Association of
Tribal Historic Preservation Officers, is now available. The guide
contains information such as: Steps in Tourism Development; Marketing
Plans; Tourism Trends; a sample visitor survey, inventory form, resident
attitude survey and sample itinerary; and a list of sources for
financial and technical assistance. The 40-page manual is available
online at http://www.nathpo.org/Toolkit/NATHPO.pdf.

THE ANCIENT CROSS TIMBERS CONSORTIUM FOR RESEARCH, EDUCATION AND
CONSERVATION
A group of researchers led by a man who helped identify the largest
tract of old-growth forest in mid-America has helped establish a
consortium to study and preserve the trees and their ecosystems. David
Stahle, professor of geosciences, has established the Ancient Cross
Timbers Consortium for Research, Education and Conservation, a group of
universities, non-profit conservation organizations, zoos and government
agencies that have an interest in one of America’s largest and
least-studied tracts of forest. Visit
http://www.uark.edu/misc/xtimber/

CONSERVATION DIRECTORY 2004
This is a valuable source of information for schools, civic
organizations or any group interested in obtaining information about
environmental laws, regulations and new initiatives. For more
information and to order, visit http://www.islandpress.org/cd2004 or
call 1-800-828-1302.

SUSTAINABLE FORESTRY RESEARCH REPORT
A report on research of a selection of private forest land related laws
and policies, including international examples. Compiled by U of MN law
student, Brandon Finke during his volunteer work with the CFRC. To
access the report go to:
http://www.forestrycenter.org/library/admin/uploadedfiles/showfile.cfm?FileName=International_Sustainable_Forestry_Research.pdf


THE FEDERAL COMMITMENT TO GREEN BUILDING: EXPERIENCES AND EXPECTATIONS
The Office of the Federal Environmental Executive has issued a report
that examines what the federal government is doing, in policy and
practice, to make its buildings more environmentally sustainable. The
report acknowledges that the government should provide leadership in
environmental design and construction and be a model for
environmentally, socially, and economically sustainable development
throughout the U.S. and the world.
http://www.ofee.gov/sb/fgb_report.html

REPORT ON BENEFITS RELATED TO ROAD INVENTORY & REMOVAL
Wildlands CPR recently commissioned a study of the economic benefits and
costs of a national program to remove unneeded and harmful roads. The
report states that reinvestment in jobs, communities and forests can
restore forests to their natural state, create local jobs, improve
fishing and hunting opportunities, and conserve money needed to maintain
popular, ecologically sound roads. Visit Wildlands CPR's website to
download the summary report, “Investing in Communities, Investing in the
Land”
<http://www.wildlandscpr.org/WCPRpdfs/NEWECOSummary_Report.pdf>.

US CITIES LOST 20 PERCENT OF TREES IN LAST 10 YEARS
According to an analysis of satellite images done by American Forests,
US cities have 20 percent fewer trees than they had 10 years ago. The
study looked at 448 urban areas. The worst tree loss occurred in the
fast-growing cities of the American Sunbelt (in the south and southwest
of the country).
http://www.planetark.org/dailynewsstory.cfm/newsid/22281/story.htm



FUNDING
FUNDS FOR NATIVE AMERICAN PROGRAMS
Seva's Native American Funding Programs support local grassroots
partnerships with Native American Peoples who have devised their own
solutions in spiritual and cultural beliefs renewal, health and wellness
renewal, environmental protection and restoration, and a variety of
other areas. Small Grants are offered for programs that may otherwise be
overlooked by larger foundations while the Continuing Grants Fund
supplies three consecutive years of funding to assist in the development
of organizational sustainability. Applications are accepted year-round.
More information is available at the website
http://www.seva.org/communitygrants.php
REGION 5 FOREST SERVICE NATIONAL FIRE PLAN GRANT APPLICATIONS
Region 5 Forest Service National Fire Plan grant programs for FY 2004
have a new "one-stop shop" process that’s an on-line application process
through the California Fire Alliance. Deadline for applications is
January 9, 2004. USFS is waiting to issue a call for proposals for the
economic recovery program until budget figures are available. The
clearinghouse is at www.grants.firesafecouncil.org; for assistance
contact Laura Chapman, Rural Community Assistance Coordinator, Six
Rivers National Forest, lcha-@fs.fed.us (707) 441-3549.

NATIONAL TREE TRUST
The National Tree Trust announces the availability of their 2004 grants,
which can be downloaded from their website at www.nationaltreetrust.org.
Through their new programs, Seeds and Roots, they will be offering two
monetary grants. The Seeds Grant for Organizational Support will provide
funding for expenses related to day-to-day business. The Roots Grant for
Community Action will provide funding for urban and community forestry
projects that help to improve the health of communities.


POSITIONS, FELLOWSHIPS, AWARDS
NATIONAL WILDLIFE FEDERATION, CAMPUS ECOLOGY FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM
National Wildlife Federation's Campus Ecology Fellowship Program offers
a nationally recognized opportunity for undergraduate and graduate
students to green their campuses and communities, gaining practical
experience in the conservation field and first-hand knowledge of the
challenges and opportunities inherent in conservation efforts. Fellows
also receive project support, modest financial compensation and
recognition of their accomplishments. Students, faculty, staff and
members of the broader community stand to gain as Campus Ecology fellows
assist with the research, design and implementation of projects that
help strike a better balance between people and nature on the campus and
beyond. Visit http://www.nwf.org/campusEcology/dspFellowships.cfm to
access the grant guidelines, selection criteria, project requirements,
perks and privileges, sample projects, online application information
and more! Contact: Kathy Cacciola, Senior Coordinator, Campus Ecology
Program, National Wildlife Federation, 11100 Wildlife Center Drive,
Reston, VA 20190-5362; Tel: 703.438.6318; Fax: 703.438.6468;
cacc-@nwf.org *REQUEST FOR FELLOWSHIP PROPOSALS: Due by DECEMBER 19,
2003*

NFF ANNOUNCES 23 NEW MAP AWARDS
Since creating the Matching Awards Program (MAP) in 2001, the National
Forest Foundation has established partnerships with more than 100
community-based and national organizations around the country, involving
more than 33,000 volunteers. Just this month, they added another 23
awards, some to new partners and others to partners we've been working
with since the beginning. To qualify for grants, organizations must show
that their projects benefit National Forest lands. Projects range from
community-based forestry work and watershed restoration, to trail
renovations and educational events. To learn more about the MAP program
and to see a list of new awardees, click on
http://www.natlforests.org/consp_04_map.html. The next round of CAP
applications is due by December 12, 2003, and the next round of MAP
pre-applications will be due by January 30, 2004. Click on
http://www.natlforests.org/consp_01_grant.html to determine which grants
program is a better fit for your organization.

AWARDS RECOGNIZE SOCIAL CHANGE LEADERS
Leadership for a Changing World is seeking nominations of community
leaders across the country who are successfully tackling tough social
problems. Seventeen outstanding social justice leaders and leadership
teams that are not broadly known beyond their immediate community or
field will receive awards of $100,000 to advance their work, plus
$15,000 for learning activities that will support their work. The
program seeks to encourage a public dialogue that recognizes a wide
variety of leaders and leadership models as authentic and important to
social progress. To this end, the program includes a major, multi-year
research initiative and numerous forums to bring awardees together with
other leaders to share experiences, address specific challenges, and
explore opportunities for collaboration. Leaders may be nominated by
someone who is well acquainted with the leader or the leadership group
and can attest to their qualifications. Deadline for submitting
nominations is January 6, 2004. Visit http://leadershipforchange.org/
for more information.


MEETINGS & WORKSHOPS

New events are marked with an asterisk (*).

WORKSHOPS ON SUSTAINABILIY PRACTICES
Beginning in Fall 2003, Bob Doppelt, Director of the Program for
Watershed and Community Health, Institute for a Sustainable Environment,
University of Oregon, will be directing a series of professional
development workshops on sustainability practices in Eugene, Oregon.
This workshop series addresses the redesigning of production models and
organizational systems to produce sustainable economic, social, and
environmental outcomes for both public and private sectors. The topics
for this year's cycle of workshops are: Sustainable governance for
high-performance organizations- Januray 8-9 2004; Zero-waste management
- March 5, 2004; Leadership skills for sustainability - May 13-14, 2004.
For more information or to register, please visit
http://center.uoregon.edu/sustainability

NORTH AMERICAN FIRE LEARNING NETWORK WORKSHOP
The fourth North American Fire Learning Network (FLN) workshop will be
held December 2-4, 2003, in Pensacola, Florida. Upwards of 100 people
representing The Nature Conservancy, federal and state agencies, and
other private institutions are expected to attend. The primary topic of
the workshop is monitoring and adaptive management. Contact Ayn Shlisky
(ashl-@tnc.org) or Douglas Zollner (dzol-@tnc.org) if you are
interested in attending this meeting. More information about the network
and this workshop is available at http://www.tnc-ecomanagement.org/fire.

* GOVERNOR'S SUMMIT: FOREST INDUSTRY SUSTAINABILITY IN THE GREAT LAKES
REGION
What are the Challenges and How Might They Best Be Addressed? The
conference will be sponsored by the Great Lakes Forest Alliance, Inc and
take place at the Holiday Inn Select, Bloomington, MN, near the
Minneapolis/St. Paul International Airport on December 11 and 12, 2003.
Register Now: http://www.lsfa.org/news_notes.html

*SMART GROWTH CONFERENCE: BUILDING SAFE, HEALTHY, AND LIVABLE
COMMUNITIES
3rd Annual New Partners for Smart Growth: Building Safe, Healthy, and
Livable Communities. This national smart growth conference brings
practitioners from all sectors for three days of workshops, tours, and
keynote speakers. The program will feature cutting-edge smart-growth
issues, the latest research, implementation tools and strategies,
successful case studies, new partners, new projects, and new policies.
The conference, sponsored by the Local Government Commission, Penn State
University, Smart Growth Network, and numerous other organizations, will
be held January 22-24, 2004 in Portland, Oregon. Visit the above website
for more information and registration instructions.
http://www.outreach.psu.edu/C&I/SmartGrowth/

*SECOND ANNUAL NATIVE AMERICAN ECOLOGICAL EDUCATION SYMPOSIUM
Sponsored by Southern Oregon University's Native American Student Union,
Ecology Center of the Siskiyous, Anthropology Club, OSPIRG, The Center
for First Nations Studies and Peace House. February 21-22, 2004, SOU
Stevenson Union, Ashland, Oregon. Free event. Honored guests include:
Agnes Baker Pilgrim, Takelma elder and Co-Director of the Takelma
Intertribal Project; Corbin Harney, elder and spiritual leader from New
Sogobia; Frank Kanawha Lake, Karuk tribal member and Graduate Research
Assistant at the Pacific Traditional Ecological Program at Oregon State
University; Bob Tom, enrolled member of the Confederated Tribes of Grand
Ronde and current president of the National Tribal Educational
Contractors Association and curriculum development consultant for the
Northwest Center for Sustainable Resources; Oshana Turtle and Marko Bey,
from the Ashland-based Lomakatsi Restoration Project, dedicated to
regeneration and rehabilitation of watersheds within the greater
Klamath-Siskiyou bioregion of southwest Oregon. Oregon and northern
California tribes have been invited to participate. Panels include Fish
Resources, Burning Practices, Basket Weaving and more. For more
information, please contact Symposium Staff at NAEES-@hotmail.com or
call ECOS at 541.552.8512.

WORKSHOP ON GLOBAL COMPETITION
“Forest Product Imports/Exports: How Will These Affect Your Future?” is
the theme for this workshop sponsored by the Lake States Lumber
Association, Inc. (LSLA). It will be held February 24, 2004, in Wausau,
WI. The keynote address by Ed Pepke, a forest products marketing
specialist for the Timber Branch of the United Nations Economic
Commission for Europe (UNECE) located in Geneva, Switzerland, will focus
on the global outlook for supply and demand for wood products in the
world and how this relates to the Lake States. Peter Ince, an economist
at FPL, will provide insight into pulpwood markets and their
relationship to demand for fiber with his talk on the global trend and
regional impacts of forest products and the outside factors affecting
them. Dan Meyer, with HARDWOODReview magazine, is slated to talk on
market and trends. Contact Terry Mace, forest products specialist with
the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, for workshop information
(608–231–9333, mac-@dnr.state.wi.us) or LSLA for registration
information (906–774–6767).

THE 1ST EASTERN OREGON SMALL DIAMETER WOOD PRODUCTS FAIR
Will be held March 2–3, 2004, in LaGrande, OR. This event is aimed at
helping eastern Oregon become a leader in ecosystem restoration,
wildfire risk reduction, and wood products utilization. Workshops, panel
discussions, exhibits, product design competitions, and networking
events will provide attendees with information on the available supply
of raw materials in the eight-county region of eastern Oregon, financial
assistance, and techniques and approaches to handling small-diameter and
underutilized species, as well as offering examples of desirable wood
products made from this material. Entrepreneurs, forest products
business owners, timber harvesting enterprises, conservation groups,
wood-processing equipment vendors, builders, engineers, and wood
enterprises are encouraged to attend. Contact Anette Christoffersen at
541–426–2311 or achristo-@eoni.com for more information.

2ND PROMISE OF PLACE CONFERENCE
Place-based Education in the Northern Forest, March 25-27th, 2004 at the
Bethel Inn, Bethel, Maine. Presented by the Northern Forest Center and
Shelburne Farms. On March 25-27th, 2004, educators, administrators,
resource experts and policy makers from across Maine, New Hampshire,
Vermont and New York, are invited to gather in support of place-based
education. More detailed information will be available this fall at
www.northernforest.org or www.shelburnefarms.org. To learn more about
the first Promise of Place conference, visit
http://www.northernforest.org/tech_programs.htm.

1ST CONFERENCE ON THE UTILIZATION OF SMALL LOGS
Sponsored by TimberWest Publications, LLC, will be held March 31–April
2, 2004, at the Coeur d’Alene Resort in Idaho. Forests have become
dangerously overstocked with small-diameter timber. The need for
intensive forest management to reduce overstocking and opportunities for
processing small-diameter logs removed from overstocked stands will be
the focus of the conference. In addition to two full days of speakers, a
Supplier’s Showcase will profile technology and products of more than 25
companies involved in the utilization of small logs. For more
information, contact Jan Raulin, Conference Manager (1–886–221–1017 or
ten-@telus.net).

CREATING SOLUTIONS FOR USING SMALL TREES
SmallWood 2004 will be held May 18–21 in Sacramento, CA. Tours, both
before and after two full days (Wednesday and Thursday) of technical and
poster presentations, discussions, and tabletop exhibits, are planned.
The pre-conference tour (Tuesday, May 18) will visit mill sites, biomass
energy facilities, and small forest products businesses in the Redding
area. The post-conference tour (Friday, May 21) in the Sacramento area
will include several facilities utilizing wood energy, a
state-of-the-art small log sawmill, and related forest products
businesses. For more information on the conference, complete the form at
www.forestprod.org/smallwood04info.html or call Julie Lang at
608–231–1361, ext. 208 (fax: 608–231–2152; e-mail:
confer-@forestprod.org).

*COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT SOCIETY NATIONAL CONFERENCE
The Community Development Society invites you to attend and participate
in its 39th Conference, July 18-24, 2004 in Cleveland, Ohio. The Society
seeks to bring together a diverse audience from the academy, the
practitioner community, neighborhood groups, financial organizations,
foundations, governments, and the international community to learn about
research and practice in the community development arena. The theme of
this conference is the Choice or Chance? The Rural Urban Futures. Under
this theme the conference's focus is concerned about the interplay
between the city and the countryside, how to bring about the benefits of
economic progress and quality of life amenities to the broadest segments
of the population. For more information, we invite you to review the
attached Call for Presenters. If you have any additional questions, feel
free to contact the CDS Business office at CD-@assnoffices.com. More
information will be posted on both the conference website
www.cds2004.org and the CDS official website at www.comm-dev.org
throughout the remainder of the year.

*ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF THE SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION SOCIETY
The 2004 annual conference of the Soil and Water Conservation Society
will be held July 24 - 28 in St. Paul, Minnesota. They have issued a
call for abstracts for an oral, poster, or symposium presentation. The
topics cover issues that are important in conservation today.
Contact Nancy Herselius for more information: Soil & Water Conservation
Society, 945 SW Ankeny Road, Ankeny, IA 50021; 515-289-2331, ext. 17;
515-289-1227 nancy.he-@swcs.org

WHERE DO I SIGN UP?

CALL FOR PAPERS - CANADIAN INSTITUTE OF FORESTRY/INSTITUT FORESTIER DU
CANADA AND SOCIETY OF AMERICAN FORESTERS' JOINT 2004 ANNUAL GENERAL
MEETING AND CONVENTION
OCTOBER 2-6, 2004, EDMONTON, ALBERTA, CANADA
This special joint event occurs only once every ten years. In 2004 it
brings you the best that SAF and CIF/IFC have to offer around the theme
"One Forest Under Two Flags." The deadline to submit an abstract is
December 17, 2003. All proposals must be submitted electronically. Visit
the official Convention website at
www.safnet.org/convention/2004call.cfm or www.cif-ifc.org/agmpage.html
for complete information and details about how to submit your proposal.

BEST EDUCATION PRACTICES for WATER OUTREACH PROFESSIONALS
The University of Wisconsin Environmental Resources Center invites
educators and researchers from all regions of the United States to
submit proposals for papers and posters to be presented at a June 2004
Symposium on Best Education Practices (BEPs) for water outreach and
education. The proposal deadline is January 30, 2004. Submission details
are available on-line at http://www.uwex.edu/erc/waterbeps.
Registration materials will be available later this fall.

_____________________________________________________________________

Editors: Wendy Gerlitz and Thomas Brendler. Special thanks to: Kate
Fernholz of Community Forestry Connections, Michael Goergen of Society
of American Foresters, Cass Moseley of the Ecosystem Workforce Program
and Mila Alvarez at American Forests.

The mission of the National Network of Forest Practitioners is to
promote the mutual well being of workers, rural communities, and forests
by supporting individuals and groups that build sustainable
relationships between forests and people. The NNFP is an alliance of
rural people working on the ground to build a forest economy that is
ecologically sound and socially just. We are a clearinghouse for
information and technical assistance, and a place for people to meet,
learn, and make their voices heard. To join the network or to obtain
more information, send an email to in-@nnfp.org and include your
regular mail address. To join the network or to obtain more
information, send an email to in-@nnfp.org and include your regular
mail address.

Suggestions and submissions for FCN are always welcome. Send them to
wger-@nnfp.org. To subscribe to FCN, send a blank email message to
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message to nnfp-fcn-u-@igc.topica.com. The easiest way to
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http://www.topica.com/lists/nnfp-fcn@igc.topica.com
	
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