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 Wellness Weekly
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Health Tips #2 ~ [Issue 0999-2]  Wellness Weekly
 Sep 14, 1999 10:03 PDT 
NO TIME FOR LONG WORKOUTS? TRY 10-MINUTE SESSIONS

The latest study to confirm the effectiveness of short, moderate
bouts comes from Deakin University in Melbourne, Australia. It found
that nine weekly 10-minute sessions offer the same cardiovascular
benefits as three weekly 30 minute sessions. That's good news for the
beginning exerciser, who may find it easier to stick to shorter, more
manageable workouts. Turn your coffee break into an exercise break.
Try 10 minutes of brisk walking before work, 10 minutes of
stair-climbing or a quick run at noon and 10 minutes of rope jumping
or cycling in the evening.

HAPPY NEWS FOR DIETERS

Trying to eat less at lunch? Living on tuna sandwiches? Still just
can't seem to lose weight? There's hope: a recent study finds that
dieters who are losing fat but aren't losing weight may retain water
for up to 16 days before they see results on the scale.

ARTIFICIAL SWEETENERS INCREASE CALORIE INTAKE

Artificially sweetened drinks may increase calorie intake and lead to
weight gain according to a recent study. People consuming an
artificially sweetened drink during exercise ate 160-190 more
calories at lunch compared to when they drank plain water or a
sucrose-sweetened drink.

CRANBERRIES MAY HELP PREVENT CANCER

According to initial studies conducted by two researchers at the
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, cranberries and related
fruit may prevent the growth of tumors by slowing down rapidly
dividing cancer cells and enabling the body to protect tissue from
cancer-causing enzymes. As reported in Reuters Corporate World News,
the findings of Associate Professor of Food Science and Human
Nutrition, Keith Singletary, and Plant Physiologist, Mary Lila Smith,
are interesting, to say the least.

According to Singletary, "the studies were done using animal cell
cultures. Right now we haven't conducted any full-blown animal
studies." Singletary believes it is much too soon to recommend
increased consumption of cranberries for the purpose of preventing
cancer. However, industry professionals like Christopher Phillips, a
spokesperson for Ocean Spray Cranberries, Inc., a cooperative
containing about 900 cranberry and citrus growers, seemed excited at
the prospect and may even contribute to ongoing studies.
	
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